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Iron workers cut crosses, Stars of David and (Credit: Lane Johnson)

Iron workers cut crosses, Stars of David and police shields out of the large pieces of steel left the in the wreckage of the World Trade Center, to keep or give away as mementos. Signs of their work are evident in pieces of steel kept in Hangar 17 at Kennedy International Airport. (August 2006)

Photos: WTC relics

Items that survived the WTC attacks.

A burned-out ambulance with its interior covered in
(Credit: Lane Johnson)

A burned-out ambulance with its interior covered in ash is among about 20 of the vehicles recovered from the World Trade Center site that are kept in Hangar 17 of Kennedy International Airport. (August 2006)

Large pieces of steel called tridents were recovered
(Credit: Lane Johnson)

Large pieces of steel called tridents were recovered from the World Trade Center site. They were once a structural part of the ground-level exterior arches of the twin towers. They are now preserved in Hangar 17 of Kennedy International Airport. There are about 1,350 pieces of steel, many weighing more than 30 tons. (August 2006)

Pieces of the broadcast antennae recovered from One
(Credit: Lane Johnson)

Pieces of the broadcast antennae recovered from One World Trade Center. Several pieces of the antennae are kept in Hangar 17 of Kennedy International Airport. (August 2006)

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Pieces of the broadcast antennae recovered from One
(Credit: Lane Johnson)

Pieces of the broadcast antennae recovered from One World Trade Center. Several pieces of the antennae are kept in Hangar 17 of Kennedy International Airport. (August 2006)

A detail of the last steel column removed
(Credit: Lane Johnson)

A detail of the last steel column removed from the World Trade Center site shows photographs attached to its surface by firefighters, New York City police officers, Port Authority police officers, victims' families and others. Flaking paint and rust have been restored by art conservationists at Hangar 17 of Kennedy International Airport. (August 2006)

A sign advertising a performance of the Arthur
(Credit: Lane Johnson)

A sign advertising a performance of the Arthur Miller play "Death of a Salesman" was recovered from the World Trade Center site and is kept in Hangar 17 of Kennedy International Airport. (August 2006)

Art conservationist Peter Gat injects resin under flaking
(Credit: Lane Johnson)

Art conservationist Peter Gat injects resin under flaking rust and paint to preserve messages inscribed on the last column of steel removed from the World Trade Center Site. The column, along with many other relics from the site, are at Hangar 17 at Kennedy International Airport. (August 2006)

Pieces of the broadcast antennae recovered from One
(Credit: Lane Johnson)

Pieces of the broadcast antennae recovered from One World Trade Center are among relics kept in Hangar 17 of Kennedy International Airport. (August 2006)

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A detail of the last steel column removed
(Credit: Lane Johnson)

A detail of the last steel column removed from the World Trade Center site shows photographs attached to its surface by firefighters, NYPD officers, Port Authority police officers, victims' families and others. Flaking paint and rust have been restored by art conservationists at Hangar 17 of Kennedy International Airport. (August 2006)

A detail of the last steel column removed
(Credit: Lane Johnson)

A detail of the last steel column removed from the World Trade Center site shows photographs attached to its surface by firefighters, NYPD officers, Port Authority police officers, victims' families and others. Flaking paint and rust have been restored by art conservationists at Hangar 17 of Kennedy International Airport. (August 2006)

Members of the New York Police Department and
(Credit: Lane Johnson)

Members of the New York Police Department and Port Authority Police Department painted a message on the last steel column removed from the World Trade Center site to commemorate the number of officers lost on Sept. 11, 2001. Flaking paint and rust have been restored by art conservationists at Hangar 17 of Kennedy International Airport. (August 2006)

Members of the Port Authority police department painted
(Credit: Lane Johnson)

Members of the Port Authority police department painted a message on the last steel column removed from the World Trade Center site to commemorate the number of officers lost on Sept. 11, 2001. Flaking paint and rust have been restored by art conservationists at Hangar 17 of Kennedy International Airport. (August 2006)

A message is seen on the last steel
(Credit: Lane Johnson)

A message is seen on the last steel column removed from the World Trade Center site. Flaking paint and rust have been restored by art conservationists at Hangar 17 of Kennedy International Airport. (August 2006)

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A sign recovered from the World Trade Center
(Credit: Lane Johnson)

A sign recovered from the World Trade Center site for the Cortlandt Street subway station is housed in Hangar 17 of Kennedy International Airport. (August 2006)

A crushed taxicab that was recovered from the
(Credit: Lane Johnson)

A crushed taxicab that was recovered from the WTC site is stored in Hangar 17 of Kennedy International Airport. (August 2006)

A crushed FDNY vehicle recovered from the World
(Credit: Lane Johnson)

A crushed FDNY vehicle recovered from the World Trade Center site is stored in Hangar 17 of Kennedy International Airport. (August 2006)

A cooler on an FDNY fire truck survived
(Credit: Lane Johnson)

A cooler on an FDNY fire truck survived the destruction at Ground Zero and is stored at Hangar 17 of Kennedy International Airport. (August 2006)

Dials on an FDNY fire truck survived the
(Credit: Lane Johnson)

Dials on an FDNY fire truck survived the destruction at Ground Zero and are stored at Hangar 17 of Kennedy International Airport. (August 2006)

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Large pieces of debris, likened to meteorites by
(Credit: Lane Johnson)

Large pieces of debris, likened to meteorites by preservationists, are actually several floors of the towers compressed together as the buildings collapsed. Furniture, twisted metal, pipes, cords and even papers with legible type are visible. The pieces are kept in a humidity-controlled tent in Hangar 17 of Kennedy International Airport. (August 2006)

Large pieces of debris, likened to meteorites by
(Credit: Lane Johnson)

Large pieces of debris, likened to meteorites by preservationists, are actually several floors of the towers compressed together as the buildings collapsed. Furniture, twisted metal, pipes, cords and even papers with legible type are visible. The pieces are kept in a humidity-controlled tent in Hangar 17 of Kennedy International Airport. (August 2006)

A poster of the New York cityscape recovered
(Credit: Lane Johnson)

A poster of the New York cityscape recovered from the World Trade Center site is kept at Hangar 17 of Kennedy International Airport. (August 2006)

Large pieces of debris, likened to meteorites by
(Credit: Lane Johnson)

Large pieces of debris, likened to meteorites by preservationists, are actually several floors of the towers that were compressed together as the buildings collapsed. Furniture, twisted metal, pipes, cords and even papers with legible type are visible. The pieces are kept in a humidity-controlled tent in Hangar 17 of Kennedy International Airport. (August 2006)

Large pieces of debris, likened to meteorites by
(Credit: Lane Johnson)

Large pieces of debris, likened to meteorites by preservationists, are actually several floors of the towers that were compressed together as the buildings collapsed. Furniture, twisted metal, pipes, cords and even papers with legible type are visible. The pieces are kept in a humidity-controlled tent in Hangar 17 of Kennedy International Airport. (August 2006)

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ADVERTISE HERE
Large pieces of debris, likened to meteorites by
(Credit: Lane Johnson)

Large pieces of debris, likened to meteorites by preservationists, are actually several floors of the towers compressed together as the buildings collapsed. Furniture, twisted metal, pipes, cords and even papers with legible type are visible. The pieces are kept in a humidity-controlled tent in Hangar 17 of Kennedy International Airport. (August 2006)

Large pieces of debris, likened to meteorites by
(Credit: Lane Johnson)

Large pieces of debris, likened to meteorites by preservationists, are actually several floors of the towers compressed together as the buildings collapsed. Furniture, twisted metal, pipes, cords and even papers with legible type are visible. The pieces are kept in a humidity-controlled tent in Hangar 17 of Kennedy International Airport. (August 2006)

Large pieces of debris, likened to meteorites by
(Credit: Lane Johnson)

Large pieces of debris, likened to meteorites by preservationists, are actually several floors of the towers compressed together as the buildings collapsed. Furniture, twisted metal, pipes, cords and even papers with legible type are visible. The pieces are kept in a humidity-controlled tent in Hangar 17 of Kennedy International Airport. (August 2006)

Large pieces of debris, likened to meteorites by
(Credit: Lane Johnson)

Large pieces of debris, likened to meteorites by preservationists, are actually several floors of the towers compressed together as the buildings collapsed. Furniture, twisted metal, pipes, cords and even papers with legible type are visible. The pieces are kept in a humidity-controlled tent in Hangar 17 of Kennedy International Airport. (August 2006)

Large pieces of debris, likened to meteorites by
(Credit: Lane Johnson)

Large pieces of debris, likened to meteorites by preservationists, are actually several floors of the towers compressed together as the buildings collapsed. Furniture, twisted metal, pipes, cords and even papers with legible type are visible. The pieces are kept in a humidity-controlled tent in Hangar 17 of Kennedy International Airport. (August 2006)

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ADVERTISE HERE
Wreckage recovered from the parking garage levels of
(Credit: Lane Johnson)

Wreckage recovered from the parking garage levels of the World Trade Center towers is housed in Hangar 17 at Kennedy International Airport. (August 2006)

Figures recovered from the Warner Bros. store at
(Credit: Lane Johnson)

Figures recovered from the Warner Bros. store at the World Trade Center mall are kept at Hangar 17 of Kennedy International Airport. (August 2006)

Magnets from the Warner Bros. store, which was
(Credit: Lane Johnson)

Magnets from the Warner Bros. store, which was in the shopping mall below the World Trade Center, were found at the site and saved. (August 2006)

This copy of the New York Times, dated
(Credit: Lane Johnson)

This copy of the New York Times, dated June 23, 1969, was found folded open to Judy Garland's obituary. Conservationists say a worker on the original building site for the World Trade Center must have left it inside the structure of the buildings. It came through the attacks unscathed. (August 2006)

These shelves in Hangar 17 of Kennedy International
(Credit: Lane Johnson)

These shelves in Hangar 17 of Kennedy International Airport hold various items saved from the retail stores that were below the World Trade Center. (August 2006)

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Amory Houghton, project manager of the Port Authority
(Credit: Lane Johnson)

Amory Houghton, project manager of the Port Authority World Trade Center artifacts program stands in front of figures from the Warner Bros. store that survived the attacks. (August 2006)

A sign reading "That's All Folks" was recovered
(Credit: Lane Johnson)

A sign reading "That's All Folks" was recovered from the World Trade Center site and is kept in Hangar 17 at Kennedy International Airport. (August 2006)

These pieces of the broadcast antennae recovered from
(Credit: Lane Johnson)

These pieces of the broadcast antennae recovered from One World Trade Center are among several kept in Hangar 17 of Kennedy International Airport. (August 2006)

A bike rack removed from the World Trade
(Credit: Lane Johnson)

A bike rack removed from the World Trade Center site is kept with other artifacts in Hangar 17 at Kennedy International Airport. (August 2006)

Iron workers cut crosses, Stars of David and
(Credit: Lane Johnson)

Iron workers cut crosses, Stars of David and police shields out of the large pieces of steel left the in the wreckage of the World Trade Center, to keep or give away as mementos. Signs of their work are evident in pieces of steel kept in Hangar 17 at Kennedy International Airport. (August 2006)

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISE HERE
Ironworkers cut crosses, Stars of David and police
(Credit: Lane Johnson)

Ironworkers cut crosses, Stars of David and police shields out of the large pieces of steel left the in the wreckage of the World Trade Center to keep or give away as mementos. Signs of their work are evident in pieces of steel kept in Hangar 17 at Kennedy International Airport. (August 2006)

Ironworkers cut crosses, Stars of David and police
(Credit: Lane Johnson)

Ironworkers cut crosses, Stars of David and police shields out of the large pieces of steel left the in the wreckage of the World Trade Center to keep or give away as mementos. Signs of their work are evident in pieces of steel kept in Hangar 17 at Kennedy International Airport. (August 2006)

Ironworkers cut crosses, Stars of David and police
(Credit: Lane Johnson)

Ironworkers cut crosses, Stars of David and police shields out of the large pieces of steel left the in the wreckage of the World Trade Center to keep or give away as mementos. Signs of their work are evident in pieces of steel kept in Hangar 17 at Kennedy International Airport. (August 2006)

Ironworkers cut crosses, Stars of David and police
(Credit: Lane Johnson)

Ironworkers cut crosses, Stars of David and police shields out of the large pieces of steel left the in the wreckage of the World Trade Center to keep or give away as mementos. Signs of their work are evident in pieces of steel kept in Hangar 17 at Kennedy International Airport. (August 2006)

Ironworkers cut crosses, Stars of David and police
(Credit: Lane Johnson)

Ironworkers cut crosses, Stars of David and police shields out of the large pieces of steel left the in the wreckage of the World Trade Center to keep or give away as mementos. Signs of their work are evident in pieces of steel kept in Hangar 17 at Kennedy International Airport. (August 2006)

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISE HERE
Ironworkers cut crosses, Stars of David and police
(Credit: Lane Johnson)

Ironworkers cut crosses, Stars of David and police shields out of the large pieces of steel left the in the wreckage of the World Trade Center to keep or give away as mementos. Signs of their work are evident in pieces of steel kept in Hangar 17 at Kennedy International Airport. (August 2006)

Ironworkers cut crosses, Stars of David and police
(Credit: Lane Johnson)

Ironworkers cut crosses, Stars of David and police shields out of the large pieces of steel left the in the wreckage of the World Trade Center to keep or give away as mementos. Signs of their work are evident in pieces of steel kept in Hangar 17 at Kennedy International Airport. (August 2006)

The pile of crumpled metal is all that
(Credit: Lane Johnson)

The pile of crumpled metal is all that remains of the shimmery, silver facade of the World Trade Center towers and is kept at Hangar 17 at Kennedy International Airport. (August 2006)

Large pieces of steel called tridents, once a
(Credit: Lane Johnson)

Large pieces of steel called tridents, once a structural part of the ground-level exterior arches of the twin towers, were recovered from the World Trade Center site and are preserved in Hangar 17 of Kennedy International Airport. Three are about 1,350 pieces of steel, many weighing more than 30 tons. (August 2006)

Large pieces of steel called tridents, once a
(Credit: Lane Johnson)

Large pieces of steel called tridents, once a structural part of the ground level exterior arches of the Twin Towers, were recovered from the World Trade Center site and are preserved in Hangar 17 of Kennedy International Airport. Three are about 1,350 pieces of steel, many weighing more than 30 tons. (August 2006)

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISE HERE
Large pieces of steel recovered from the World
(Credit: Lane Johnson)

Large pieces of steel recovered from the World Trade Center site sit in Hangar 17 at Kennedy International Airport. (August 2006)

Pieces of steel recovered from the World Trade
(Credit: Lane Johnson)

Pieces of steel recovered from the World Trade Center site are preserved in Hangar 17 of Kennedy International Airport. There are about 1,350 pieces of steel, many weighing over 30 tons. (August 2006)

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