Adam Bradley, ex-White Plains mayor, gets April trial date

Former White Plains Mayor Adam Bradley's conviction in

Former White Plains Mayor Adam Bradley's conviction in a domestic violence case was overturned after an appeals court concluded that the ex-mayor was deprived of a fair trail. Bradley was arrested after he was accused of intentionally slamming a door on his wife's hands during an argument in 2010. (Oct. 17, 2012) (Credit: Westchester County district attorney's office)

Former White Plains Mayor Adam Bradley's retrial on attempted assault and harassment charges stemming from a fight with his ex-wife will be held in April, a White Plains judge said Thursday.

Bradley appeared in State Supreme Court on Thursday morning, where Judge Richard Molea set April 8 as the new trial date. Westchester County District Attorney Janet DiFiore is retrying the former mayor after his 2010 conviction was overturned.

Bradley, 51, was found guilty by Judge Susan Capeci in 2010 of attempting to assault his wife, Fumiko Bradley, 40, by slamming a door on her fingers Feb. 27 of that year. He also was convicted of harassment.

Adam Bradley, a Democrat and former state assemblyman, was considered a rising star in state politics before charges were filed against him. He resigned as mayor after his conviction.

The defense was barred from calling witnesses who would have testified that Fumiko Bradley told them her injury was accidental, not intentional. That, in part, led to the conviction being overturned.

Adam Bradley will be tried by a jury this time.

"After my experience with a judge that clearly, wrongfully convicted me and deprived me of a fair trial, I'd rather put my hand in a jury of my peers," the ex-mayor told News12.

Adam Bradley's attorney, Amy Bellantoni, said she will call witnesses -- including a marriage counselor -- at the trial who will rebut the abuse allegations.

A State Supreme Court panel said it decided to overturn Adam Bradley's conviction after the original trial judge "improperly precluded the defendant from adducing testimony which showed that his wife told others that the bedroom door was accidentally closed on her hand."

Adam Bradley called the retrial political persecution by the DA's office, but he declined to speculate on why he believed DiFiore, a Democrat, would target him. The DA's office didn't return a phone call seeking comment on the retrial.

Fumiko Bradley said her ex-husband abused her and that the evidence against him was strong. The couple had two daughters together, and an order of protection prohibits the former mayor from contacting his ex-wife.

Adam Bradley said his ex-wife suffers from "mental issues" and said he was preparing to release copies of "angry" emails purportedly sent by his ex-wife before the trial. Those documents are expected to be presented at his retrial.

With Ron Bittner

advertisement | advertise on newsday

Newsday on social media

@Newsday

advertisement | advertise on newsday