After a long snowy winter, the only white that Long Islanders want to see on a grass field is the line that separates fair territory from foul. The Mets and Yankees begin their 2015 season Monday, and these apps can add to your viewing enjoyment or help take you out to the ballgame.

MLB.com At Bat

(iOS, Android; free)

This official app from Major League Baseball features a complete redesign for the 2015 season, which will be especially noticeable for Android users running Lollipop. At Bat also supports the Apple Watch, so users of the much-anticipated wearable device can see scores with the flick of a wrist. While the app has some free features, you will need a subscription to access live game audio ($2.99 a month). To get live streaming video through the app, you have to subscribe to MLB.TV Premium ($24.99 a month).

MLB Preplay

(iOS, Android; free)

Anyone can predict what will happen in a replay, but making a right prediction before the play occurs is trickier. With this app you try to outguess other players about what will happen during each at bat, inning or game. The better your predictions, the more points you score.

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Home Run Derby

(iOS, Android; free)

This app is typically updated during the season when the All-Star game approaches, but until then it is still fun to play using real players from 2014. The goal is, obviously, to hit as many home runs as possible. As you progress, you unlock features that make hitting homers easier. You can also purchase power boosts as in-app purchases. The graphics are stunning, but the arcade-type play is hard to master.

StubHub

(iOS, Android; free)

Let's say it's a beautiful spring day, and you decide nothing could be better than spending nine innings at the ballpark. You can head to Yankee Stadium or Citi Field and buy tickets at the box office, or you can load up this popular app and browse for best seats and maybe even some bargains. Have tickets but can't make the game? Sell them using the app.

 

Tech bytes

 

Fare warning

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Last month's subway and bus fare increase played havoc with anyone who hates a MetroCard with a small, unusable balance. Fortunately, the MTA has updated its online calculator to reflect both the new $2.75 fare and the higher 11 percent bonus for MetroCard users. The calculator tells you the exact amount you need to reload so you don't have a leftover balance. Access the calculator at nwsdy.li/mta-calc.

Snap happy

If you're 34 or younger, chances are you're part of the Snapchat generation and think Facebook is for your grandparents. A new study by research firm ComScore found that 71 percent of the photo-messaging app's users were under 35. As for Facebook, only 38 percent of users were under 35. And 10 percent of Facebook users were 65 or older, the highest number of seniors on any social network.

Your government at work

Uncle Sam wants you . . . to know how many people are using government websites. The new Digital Analytics Program (analytics.usa.gov) offers a real-time window on traffic at 300 government Web domains. Not surprisingly, the most accessed website over the past month is the IRS' Where's My Refund site. While you're watching the government, it is not watching you. The General Services Administration says it does not track visitors to the site.