In 2013, David Hershberg exited the sprawling 150,000-square-foot complex at Globecomm Systems Inc. in Hauppauge after a private equity buyout.

These days, he's running STS Global Inc., a satellite communications startup in 900 square feet at the Stony Brook University Center of Excellence in Wireless and Information Technology incubator.

Hershberg, 78, said he is relishing starting over at STS with longtime colleagues who migrated from Globecomm.

"I love what I'm doing," he said after delivering a keynote address last week to a Long Island Capital Alliance forum in Melville. "It's like going to a fraternity party every day."

In his address, Hershberg said that STS benefited because the new owners of Globecomm "laid off some of the better people."

At the same time, he said, prospective clients can be wary of a new company.

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"People don't know you," Hershberg said. "They're looking for some history. They want three years of revenue. They want to know how many employees and everything else."

In response, Hershberg seeks to convey the "couple of hundred years' experience" carried by the staff of 7-month-old STS, part of the state-subsidized Startup New York program.

"We're a new company [but] we're one of the oldest new companies around," he said. "You're selling your people, not your company."

In November 2013, Globecomm shareholders approved an offer of about $340 million by Manhattan private equity firm Wasserstein & Co. to take private the company Hershberg founded in 1994 and built into a publicly traded company with operations around the world.

Hershberg's speech stressed that interpersonal relations and ethical conduct can lead to business success.

It's "easy to lose a customer [and] very hard to get them back," he said. Run your business "as if anything you do will be on the front page of The New York Times."

Hershberg said that during his tenure, employee turnover was only 3 percent.

Five startup companies seeking funding presented at the LI Capital Alliance forum:

Buncee LLC, a Calverton maker of digital creation tools for the education market;

Centrallo LLC, a New York City-based creator of a list-making and note-taking app;

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Code Dx Inc., the Northport developer of software that helps enterprises assess the vulnerabilities of their software;

Poem Technology LLC, the Huntington maker of wireless devices that monitor the levels in oil tanks and alert suppliers;

URBNEYE, the New York City developer of a mobile application that lets prospective patrons view the scene at bars and restaurants before going.