Three technologies nurses want were discussed at the recent ACI Medical Liability conference. The Physician-Patient Alliance for Health & Safety (PPAHS) conducted a survey among 73 nurses who are members of the American Hospital Association (AHA).

Chicago, IL (PRWEB) November 04, 2015

Three technologies nurses want were discussed at the recent ACI Medical Liability conference.

The Physician-Patient Alliance for Health & Safety (PPAHS) conducted a survey among 73 nurses who are members of the American Hospital Association (AHA). The AHA leads, represents and serves hospitals, health systems and other related organizations that are accountable to the community and committed to health improvement.

Preliminary survey results found that nurses want:

  •     Patient monitors that are wearable and wireless (79 percent).
  •     A single monitor multi-parameter device that measures all current physiological monitoring parameters (67 percent).
  •     Monitors that are interoperable (45 percent).

Michael Wong, JD (Executive Director, PPAHS) said that the findings are only preliminary as the survey data is being analyzed. He said, “The survey results indicate the technological tools nurses would like to have to better perform their tasks.”

Sandra K. Hanneman, PhD, RN, FAAN (Jerold B. Katz Distinguished Professor for Nursing Research, University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth), School of Nursing, Center for Nursing Research) commented on the preliminary results. Noting that statisticians are currently analyzing the results, she said, “The preliminary results show that nurses would like patient monitoring technology that is wearable and wireless. Having such technology would mean patients are not tethered to machines and foster greater patient mobility.”

Dr. Hanneman will be the lead author of the final survey report and is also on the PPAHS board of advisors.

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“Our work as nurses is prevention and early detection of deterioration to keep patients safe and facilitate rapid recovery,” said Dr. Hanneman. “At times current patient monitoring technology contributes to the development of complications because it hampers patient movement.”

If you would like a copy of the survey results, please complete the information at http://wp.me/p5JhsL-1zA.

To view a pdf of the presentation made at the ACI conference, please click here.

About Physician-Patient Alliance for Health & Safety

Physician-Patient Alliance for Health & Safety is a non-profit 501(c)(3) whose mission is to promote safer clinical practices and standards for patients through collaboration among healthcare experts, professionals, scientific researchers, and others, in order to improve health care delivery. For more information, please go to http://www.ppahs.org

For the original version on PRWeb visit: http://www.prweb.com/releases/2015/11/prweb13062272.htm