Kratos is back in the fifth and final chapter in the God of War story.

This time Kratos takes his never-ending quest for revenge all the way to the top of Olympus, teaming up with the Titans to tear the heavens apart to take down the gods and the ruler of them all Zeus himself.

While Kratos has already brought down Ares, Athena, Medusa, Hydras, and hoards of Greek mythological creatures, is he tough enough to withstand the the infinite armies of the blogosphere?

We rounded-up some of the reviews floating through the blogosphere and the consensus seems to be that God of War III is one of the most visually stunning and game-play engrossing titles ever made. Have you played the game? Let us know what you think.Gamespot
"God of War III relishes death like few other games, glorifying the downfall of mythical beasts, rock-solid Titans, and not-quite-immortal gods in grotesque and satisfying fashion. The visceral combat and overwhelming sense of scale that have become the hallmarks of this brutal franchise have been pushed further than ever before in God of War III, creating an experience so focused and explosively fun that it's hard to put down, and even harder to forget."

Game Informer
"God of War III takes the biggest strides forward in its cinematic presentation, but the nuts and bolts of the combat are also more refined. If you've played the previous games in the series, you'll find everything you love about Kratos' blade-slinging style intact, but even better than before thanks to the seamless integration of items. This new equipment (usually ripped from the dead fingers of a fallen adversary) allows you to dash, stun enemies, and perform ranged attacks – and they all draw from a rapidly recharging power source. This gives you the freedom to use these versatile tools instead of conserving them, opening new combo possibilities. Used in conjunction with the sweet new weapons (I love the Cestus!) and maneuvers (I love the ranged grab!), these additions make Kratos feel like an even more fluid and capable combatant."
Gaming Trend
"Many games, God of War and God of War II included, had issues where the game became very difficult because your character would simply have to execute the full animation of their attack, often as you watched helplessly as an incoming attack shredded you to ribbons. There is nothing of that sort here. While the combat system has been rebuilt, the fluidity of the animation system in this game is beyond compare, making for one of the most smooth combat systems I've ever seen. In fact, when I first engaged the enemy it felt somewhat strange – gone were the little hitches in combat I had seen as I played through the two previous titles recently, replaced by silk-smooth transitions. Using other weapons in the game didn't break this fluidity. This doesn't mean the game is less difficult, just less frustrating. Again, God of War III raises the bar."

Telegraph.co.uk
"It's an overused adjective, isn't it, ‘epic'? Especially in video game critique or in those bullet-point lists that pop from the back of the box in a snazzy font. "EPIC STORYLINE" they scream, when their qualifier seems to be having the main character chatting for a bit during a cutscene, perhaps discussing their feelings or how much they hate terrorists. "HAS A STORYLINE" probably isn't as much of a sell. Nor is "THE BOSSES ARE QUITE BIG, I GUESS" when boasting of beasties to fight. God of War III is taking the word back for itself. You want to claim your game/film/novel is epic; you're going to have to go through Kratos, who will likely tear your arm off and beat you to death with the wet end, given that he's the angriest man in the history of everything. Nothing's more epic in this game than Kratos's grump."

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Eurogamer
"...the story of God of War III couldn't be simpler: the game is basically about climbing a mountain to kill the man that lives at the top. The fact that the mountain is Olympus, the man at the top is Zeus, and things kick off with a boot in the face that drops you all the way back down to Hades only adds to the enjoyment. It's not BioShock, in other words, but such a loose framework has given the developer the chance to let rip with the detailing - and the detailing is beautiful stuff. True to the standards set by the previous instalments, this is a staggeringly good-looking game. Set-pieces are gigantic but artful, consumed with sweeping arcs of the camera and huge, intricate environments, while the sky overhead is latticed by flaming comets and boiling wreckage as heaven itself comes apart."