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Technology historians say the IBM's System 360, unveiled (Credit: AP (1964))

Technology historians say the IBM's System 360, unveiled April 7, 1964, was one of the most influential computer rollouts ever. A special IBM selectric typewriter, being used by the man, would allow programmers to talk to the mainframe, left background.

IBM products through the years

IBM was incorporated in the state of New York on June 16, 1911 as the Computing- Tabulating- Recording Company (C-T-R). But the company's origins can be traced back to the invention of the dial recorder by Dr. Alexander Dey in 1888, which became a building block of C-T-R. As the company expanded beyond recording devices it changed its name to International Business Machines Corp. in February 1924. Twenty years later, IBM completed the Automatic Sequence Controlled Calculator, which marked its first step towards computing, and in 1952 it introduced the first large computer, the IBM 701. As customer demand for its computers waned in the 21st century, the company shifted its focus to infrastructure support of e-businesses with a new generation of servers.

Navy technicians stand in front of the Automatic
(Credit: AP (1944))

Navy technicians stand in front of the Automatic Sequence Controlled Calculator at Harvard University in Cambridge, Mass., on Aug. 7, 1944. The calculator was developed that year by International Business Machines Corp. and is considered a key step towards computing.

This 1954 photo shows IBM's “Electronic Brain,” the
(Credit: AP (1954))

This 1954 photo shows IBM's “Electronic Brain,” the 701 Electronic Data Processing Machine. It marked the company's first collaboration with Citi as the machine reduced the time for a cost-benefit analysis from 1,000 man-hours to 9.5 minutes.

Technology historians say the IBM's System 360, unveiled
(Credit: AP (1964))

Technology historians say the IBM's System 360, unveiled April 7, 1964, was one of the most influential computer rollouts ever. A special IBM selectric typewriter, being used by the man, would allow programmers to talk to the mainframe, left background.

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This IBM medium scale computer System 370 Model
(Credit: AP (1970))

This IBM medium scale computer System 370 Model 155, was announced by the company June 30, 1970 in New York. IBM said this computer system was faster and had a higher storage capacity than previous models. Employee Linda Larrick operates the computer at the firm's Field System Center in Poughkeepsie, N.Y.

The new IBM Personal Computer system for home
(Credit: AP (1981))

The new IBM Personal Computer system for home and school use is shown in Aug. 1981. The expandable system included a monitor screen, printer and disk drives and was a competitor to the Apple II.

A man tries out the enhanced version of
(Credit: AP (1983))

A man tries out the enhanced version of International Business Machines Corp.'s Personal Computer, which was unveiled in New York, March 8, 1983. IBM also introduced several other related products, including devices that boost the memory of its existing machine, a color display terminal and new software, or programs, to run both the personal computer and the new model.

Bruce Claflin, general manager of product and brand
(Credit: AP (1994))

Bruce Claflin, general manager of product and brand management for IBM Corp., holds a ThinkPad 360Cs with a communications module as he stands beside a Value Point 100DX4/Dp personal computer in New York on May 17, 1994. The company introduced these two models, among others, in an effort to “lay the foundation for continued growth.”

IBM introduced a thin, light notebook computer May
(Credit: AP (1996))

IBM introduced a thin, light notebook computer May 21, 1996 with a large screen typically seen on heavier models. The ThinkPad 560 was 1.2 inches thick, weighed 4.1 pounds, had a 12.1-inch diagonal color screen and started at $2,700. It was released four years after IBM's original ThinkPad laptop.

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IBM's TransNote, a nifty combination of notebook computer
(Credit: AP (2001))

IBM's TransNote, a nifty combination of notebook computer and digital writing tablet, was unveiled in January 2001. The 600Mhz, $3,000 member of the Thinkpad line of laptops was targeted at professionals who took a lot of notes and then have trouble keeping track of them, IBM said.

Erich Clementi, general manager of IBM Systems, describes
(Credit: AP (2005))

Erich Clementi, general manager of IBM Systems, describes the company's new z9 mainframe computer in New York, July 26, 2005. IBM spent $1.2 billion over three years developing the new mainframe, which it said had twice the processing power and twice the memory of Big Blue's current top mainframe. The price started around $1 million.

Lead engineer Don Grice of IBM is shown
(Credit: AP (2008))

Lead engineer Don Grice of IBM is shown inspecting the world's fastest computer, nicknamed "Roadrunner", in the company's Poughkeepsie, N.Y. plant. The $100 million machine has performed 1,000 trillion calculations per second in a sustained exercise. The technology breakthrough was accomplished by engineers from the Los Alamos National Laboratory and the IBM Corp. on a computer to be used primarily on nuclear weapons work, including simulating nuclear explosions.

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