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Sony Bravia KDL-52NX800 CNET rating: 3.5 stars out
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Sony Bravia KDL-52NX800

CNET rating: 3.5 stars out of 5 (Very Good)

The good: Excellent design with stylish monolithic exterior; ergonomic remote control; snappy menu system; relatively accurate color; built-in Wi-Fi; solid Internet services including Netflix, Amazon Video on Demand, niche video services, and Yahoo Widgets; energy-efficient.

The bad: Relatively expensive; reproduces lighter black levels; darker areas tinged blue; cannot adjust dejudder processing much; less-even screen uniformity; glossy screen reflects ambient light; Netflix image quality worse than on other streaming devices.

The cost: $2,210.00 - $2,899.99

The bottom line: Despite a picture that won't wow sticklers, Sony's edge-lit LED-based NX800 sets a high bar for its beautiful design and well-executed features. Sony Bravia Internet Video seeks to differentiate itself from the pack with more video services than the other guys, so in addition to stalwarts like Netflix and Amazon VOD, it has a new "QRIOCITY" on-demand video service and offers niche video names not found on other makers, like minisode network, blip.tv, style.com, howcast.com, and numerous video podcasts.

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Internet-connected TVs

In 2009, which saw the first serious attempts at TVs with built-in Internet services, we reviewed plenty of mixed bags. On the plus side, essential streaming video services like Netflix and Vudu seemed to work relatively well, but on the minus side, utility widgets (mainly powered by Yahoo) were sluggish, remotes were unwieldy, Wi-Fi was nonexistent, and content selections were limited.

In 2010, most if not all of those problems have been addressed by many makers. Below we take a look at the major manufacturers' Internet-enabled TV platforms that we like best. ©2014 CBS Interactive Inc., a CBS Company. All rights reserved. Used by permission

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