Uncle Giuseppe’s Marketplace will open next year in the former Waldbaum’s supermarket at the Melville Mall.

The specialty grocer will move into the nearly 53,000-square-foot space formerly occupied by Waldbaum’s in the mall, on Route 110 just north of the Northern State Parkway. The new store is expected to open by summer 2017, according to the mall’s landlord Federal Realty Investment Trust.

Uncle Giuseppe’s is a full-service supermarket, selling fresh seafood and prepared foods ranging from homemade pastas and sauces to hand-rolled sushi. The Farmingdale-based chain has other Long Island locations in East Meadow, Smithtown, Port Washington, Port Jefferson Station, and Massapequa. It opened its first location in East Meadow in 1998.

“As the seventh store for Uncle Giuseppe’s Marketplace, and the sixth to open in New York, we are thrilled to bring the Uncle Giuseppe’s family to all of the families who live in this centrally located spot on Long Island,” Uncle Giuseppe’s president Philip DelPrete said in a statement.

Uncle Giuseppe’s wants to hire more than 200 employees for the Melville Mall store, including butchers, cooks, bakers and customer service representatives. Applicants can send a resume to janeth@uncleg.com.

Kenneth Schuckman, president of Lake Success-based Schuckman Realty, represented the tenant and the landlord in the lease transaction.

advertisement | advertise on newsday

Uncle Giuseppe’s will join other retailers at the Melville Mall such as Macy’s Backstage, which opened last year, and Field & Stream, expected to open later this year.

Uncle Giuseppe’s “will not only meet the community’s need for a grocer, but will also further enhance Melville Mall’s offerings and Federal Realty’s vision for this property,” Federal Realty development manager David Joss said in a statement.

The lease of the former Waldbaum’s store was bought back last year by Rockville, Maryland-based Federal Realty for $700,000 from the bankrupt Great Atlantic & Pacific Tea Co.

All 51 Waldbaum’s and Pathmark stores on Long Island operated by A&P, which filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy, closed by November. Thirty were purchased by supermarket chains, 20 were turned over to their landlords, and one was sold to a real estate company.