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In the Garage: 1927 LaSalle

1927 LaSalle roadster owned by John Micciche.

1927 LaSalle roadster owned by John Micciche. (Credit: Handout)

THE CAR AND ITS OWNER

1927 LaSalle roadster owned by John Micciche

WHAT MAKES IT INTERESTING

Beyond its mechanical prowess, the 1927 LaSalle is widely regarded as a milestone vehicle and a pacesetter for automotive design.  Period ads describe its “charm of appearance” and picture various models in fashionable European settings.  Offered as a lower-priced line by Cadillac from 1927 to 1940, LaSalle stood on its own as a premium brand.  “General Motors’ intention was to fill the large price gap between Cadillac and Buick,” Micciche says.  “The LaSalle was the first General Motors car designed by Harley Earl, who went on to a 30-year career at GM and eventually gained control of all design and styling.  Fast for the day, a stripped-down roadster averaged 95.2 miles per hour over a distance of 952 miles before an oil leak ended the run.”

HOW LONG HE’S OWNED IT

Since 2010

WHERE HE FOUND IT

“I purchased it from a private collector in St. Louis,” says Micciche, who estimates that only six such cars still exist.

CONDITION

“When I purchased the car, it looked much like it does today,” he says.  “However, mechanically, it was a disaster.  I knew that it needed a lot of work, but I wanted it because it is rare and I loved what it looks like.  We have rebuilt the engine and rebuilt or replaced just about every moving part and many of the non-moving parts in the car.  Many parts were missing.  Some of the missing parts were found on the Internet or through networking, but many had to be made.  Much of the chrome was replated.”

TIPS FOR OWNERS

“Know ahead of time that finding any missing or damaged parts is going to be very difficult,” Micciche advises.  “The Internet is a great source and place to start.  But I have found that the most successful path to finding a part you need is by contacting a person who knows a person.”

VALUE

“The economy and trends will cause the value of this type of car to vary tremendously,” he says.  The NADA Guides places a “high retail” value of $85,700 on a 1927 roadster.

THE BOTTOM LINE

“I believe that this car is a work of art, just like any painting or sculpture,” Micciche says.  “I can admire it like any other work of art and I can drive it, too.”

IF YOU HAVE an antique, classic or collectible vehicle to be considered for this page, please submit your information and photo(s) at www.inthegarage.net or contact David Fluhrer, Newsday Cars, at thegarage@optonline.net.

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