This 3.2-acre Springs compound has a three-bedroom, 2 1⁄2-bath main house, a two-story cottage — and the grave of Thomas Jefferson Davis, an African-American sailor who served in the Civil War. The property is listed for $2.2 million.

“When I toured the property, I knew the cemetery was there. I thought it was sort of a cool thing,” says owner Steve Symonds, who has lived here for 14 years.

Home Search

Search Newsday for over 100,000 homes

Davis’ final resting place is preserved at the rear of the property amid mature specimen trees, rhododendron, azaleas and other plantings, and is one of many small Hamptons grave sites, says listing agent Jackie Dunphy of The Corcoran Group. She is co-listing with Greg Schmidt.

The single-story main house features high ceilings and an open floor plan and includes a renovated chef’s kitchen with marble surfaces and stainless steel Sub-Zero and Wolf appliances.

It opens to a sunroom with radiant heat and floor-to-ceiling windows — one of Symonds’ favorite parts of the home.

A master bedroom wing with sliding doors to the yard features a fireplace, a large closet and a spa-like bath en suite. Two guest bedrooms are found on the opposite side of the house.

advertisement | advertise on newsday

The guest cottage has two en suite bedrooms, a full guest bath, a kitchen and an open living room with a fireplace, as well as an office, a patio and a second outdoor shower.

Outdoor creature comforts include a pond-styled gunite pool, a rock Jacuzzi and a new deck. There is also a two-car detached garage.

Davis enlisted in the Union Navy on April 15, 1864, and served until the end of the Civil War on the USS Heliotrope, a wooden steamboat that was part of the Potomac Flotilla, according to research by local historian Hugh R. King.

Symonds learned more about Davis’ Civil War service after he moved in and met his neighbor, a schoolteacher whose interest in the grave site piqued King’s curiosity.

“I love the fact that the VFW comes out every Memorial Day and puts a fresh flag on the grave so he continues to be honored,” Symonds says.