Architect Alfred Scheffer designed this Amagansett mansion for Fabergé cosmetics founder Samuel Rubin’s 30-acre Quail Hill estate. It is listed for $7.595 million.

The 5,500-square-foot home on 5.3 acres was renovated in 2012, but retains quintessential Scheffer designs such as the living room’s stone fireplace, vaulted ceilings, exposed cedar beams, bluestone floors with radiant heat, and a curved, floor-to-ceiling corner window.

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Updates include an expanded kitchen with a Calcatta Gold island, radiant heat floors and Miele, Sub-Zero and Wolf appliances. Bathrooms were also renovated and a new multipurpose room was added above the kitchen extension, says Jackie Dunphy of The Corcoran Group, who is co-listing the property with Greg Schmidt.

A first-floor master bedroom includes marble his-and-hers en-suite bathrooms, two walk-in closets and a private mahogany deck. Wide plank white oak flooring, custom cabinetry, marble, granite, glass tiles and countertops and mahogany handrails are found throughout.

Manicured, fairway-like lawns fill the property adjoining the Peconic Land Trust’s Quail Hill Farm; there are mature specimen trees, bluestone patios, an outdoor fireplace, and an elliptical pool. A potting shed and a three-car detached garage with a 650-square-foot guest-caretaker’s apartment are also included.

Technological updates include a 40-panel, 10-kilowatt solar system, geothermal HVAC, 13 internet-controllable thermostats, a 10-zone Sonos sound system and a four-camera security system. There is also a 20-kilowatt Generac generator, updated wiring and plumbing, and spray-in foam insulation throughout.

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In years past, Quail Hill included another piece of iconic and valuable Hamptons real estate — Rubin converted a 1830s-era windmill into a 1,300-square-foot guesthouse, where tenants included Marilyn Monroe and Arthur Miller and actor Terrence Stamp, according to published reports.

After Upjohn pharmaceutical heiress Deborah Ann Light purchased the estate in 1967, author Kurt Vonnegut was a tenant for several years, according to Light’s East Hampton Star 2015 obituary.

Light later donated 20 acres of Quail Hill to the Peconic Land Trust, of which she was a founding member. The Rubin home and the windmill house have since become stand-alone 5-plus acre estates.

Correction: A previous version of this story had the wrong first name for one of the listing agents.