Since the house that inspired the “Amityville Horror” book and films came on the market two weeks ago, there have been showings to only “a half-dozen” potential buyers, three of whom have made a formal offer, says the property’s listing agent.

“Nothing is moving along at a great pace,” says Jerry O’Neill of Coldwell Banker Harbor Light of any likely deals in the works.

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Only those who appear to be serious about purchasing the $850,000 waterfront property have been allowed inside the legendary home, which for decades has attracted curiosity seekers who drive or boat by and often stop to take photos.

While O’Neill says he has been flooded with inquiries about the house since its June 3 listing, seller Caroline D’Antonio is requiring an application, bank prequalification, proof of funds and the name of the buyer’s attorney before a real estate agent can take a client through the front door. Even then, only the agent and buyer will be allowed in, “no friends or family,” according to the application. Photos and video of the interior are not allowed (there are also no interior photos on the real estate listing, per the owner’s wishes).

Newsday honored a request not to capture pictures during a recent tour of the 1927 Dutch Colonial — the site of the 1974 DeFeo murders and a house that is very different from the one portrayed in the story of the supernatural.

There is no sign of a secret room such as the one dubbed the “passage to hell” in the movies and book, for instance. Asked about the space, O’Neill, who was friends with a former owner growing up and attended sleepovers in the basement, said, “There was never such a space in this house. It didn’t exist. That’s why we call it the ‘Amityville Hoax.’ ”