A Westhampton Beach home built on Dune Road in the early 1900s recently sold for $12.2 million, according to the real estate firm that listed the property.

The shingle-style home — with eight bedrooms, six full bathrooms and two half-baths — first listed in October for $16.9 million. It is situated on 5.1 acres, which includes more than 300 feet of oceanfront. The house was previously owned by Wendy Keys, the former executive producer for the Film Society of Lincoln Center and wife of the late Donald Pels, a media executive and pioneer in the wireless and communications industry. The buyer, who purchased the house under Crampton Society LLC, has experience restoring similar properties, says Jeanmarie Braat of Saunders & Associates, the listing and selling broker of the house.

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“No one wanted to see this house torn down and a new McMansion put up,” Braat says. “So my goal was to find someone who would appreciate all of those elements of the old-world architecture and features. [The new owner] is thrilled to have a house that has characteristics of that era and intends to maintain it.”

Braat says the house was designed by architect J. Sarsfield Kennedy, whose work included the Gingerbread House in Bay Ridge and the Picnic House in Prospect Park. Braat says that the house was designed with preventive features that helped it withstand the 1938 hurricane.

“All Dune Road properties that existed at that time, none of them existed after the 1938 hurricane, with the exception of this one,” Braat says. “It was really well built and with some forethought.”

Features in the house include beamed ceilings, four stone fireplaces, screened porches, bay windows with banquet seating and glass doors off the kitchen that open to a terrace with ocean views. The house boasts a gunite pool, spa and pool house, which was built after the original construction but with matching features to that of the house, Braat says.

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“It’s the most prominent oceanfront property in Westhampton Beach, without a doubt,” Braat says. “Not just that it’s been around since the early 1900s — everyone that comes to Westhampton Beach knows and appreciates this house.”