The Long Island Rail Road, founded in 1834, counts Mineola among its earliest Main Line stations. At the time of completion in 1839, the Hempstead Branch, as it was then known, ran from Mineola to Hempstead down Main Street. Today, commuters heading west to work in Manhattan from this incorporated village can count on reaching bustling midtown from Main Street in as little as 32 minutes via a peak express train.

It is just one of the attractions that Mayor Scott Strauss says keeps the area's real estate in high demand. Nancy Jarvis of Daniel Gale Sotheby's International Realty says she sees buyers coming to Mineola from Bayside and Flushing, a likely testimony to the easy commute.

The mayor, who calls Mineola a "large village with a small-town feel," lists summertime concerts and movie nights held on an open baseball field in Memorial Park as warm-weather highlights for residents. A planned Village Green project that centers around the construction of two new apartment complexes at the southern end of Old Country Road corridor (with talks of a third) will add to the metropolitan air of downtown, he says, mixing urban with suburban and attracting new, young inhabitants. Overall, says Strauss, Mineola is a "family-friendly area built up by solid finances and great school districts."

Real estate agent Michael Trezza of C Trez Homes notes that those same school districts top the list of reasons why families seek out homes in the village. With access to Mineola and East Williston schools, residents are afforded the experience of a "top notch" education. It's an area where people "seem to move [to] and stay for their whole lives," says Trezza -- a just approximation based on what Trezza says is a current low inventory of single-family homes and the plans to increase the number of apartments via the Village Green renovation project.

Strauss looks to this real estate venture to not only expand housing options, but increase jobs as well. A revitalization of the downtown area will boost the entire neighborhood, bringing in more residents, more businesses and more economic opportunities to the village, says Strauss.

For now, though, the area's properties are composed mainly of single-family homes, varying in style from ranch to Colonial to Cape to Tudor.

Mineola, whose name is derived from a Native American word, meniolagamika, meaning "a friendly or pleasant village," is summed up succinctly by Jarvis: "affordable homes, with low taxes, that are close to trains and shopping."

CONDOS AND TOWN HOUSES: 6 condo listings, $264,000 to $395,000; 21 co-ops, $89,900 to $269,000

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SALES PRICES: From Feb. 1, 2014, to March 10, 2015, there were 110 sales, with a median price of $485,000, according to Multiple Listing Service of Long Island data. The low price was $280,000 and the high was $925,000. During the same period a year earlier, the median price was $465,000. The low price was $285,000 and the high was $750,000.

ATTRACTIONS: A residents-only pool; Memorial Park and Wilson Park; the Mineola Fair; proximity to shopping at Roosevelt Field mall and The Gallery at Westbury Plaza

OTHER STATS

Town: North Hempstead (also a small section in Hempstead)

Area: 1.9 square miles

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ZIP code 11501

Population: 18,799

Median age 41.8

Median household income: $76,604

Median home value: $490,000*

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LIRR time to NYC: 32 to 43 minutes at peak

Monthly ticket: $252

School district: Most students attend Mineola; some go to East Williston or Carle Place.

SOURCES: 2010 Census; mlsli.com; LIRR;

*Based on sales in the past six months, according to MLSLI

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HOUSES ON MULTIPLE LISTINGS

Number of houses: 38

Price range: $359,000 to $875,000

Tax range: $6,701 to $15,403

NOW ON THE MARKET

Starter, $359,000

This five-room Cape on a 50-by-100-foot lot has three bedrooms, one bath, a full basement and hardwood floors. Taxes are $7,283. Nancy Jarvis, Daniel Gale Sotheby's International Realty, 516-334-3606.

Trade-up, $529,000

With updates such as two new baths, new windows and a new roof, this four-bedroom, 4,000-square-foot expanded Cape has a finished basement and is located on a cul-de-sac. Total taxes are $10,092. Michael Fink, Laffey Fine Homes, 516-741-3070.

High-end, $875,000

Featuring high-end appliances, oak floors, crown moldings and a full basement, this newly constructed Colonial has four bedrooms and 2 1/2 bathrooms, on a 50-by-100-foot lot. Taxes are $13,721. Vito Lippolis, Charles Rutenberg Realty Inc. 516-974-4905.

RECENTLY SOLD

ROSELLE STREET, $605,000

After 20 days on the market, this expanded Cape, built in 1952, sold for $14,000 less than the original asking price of $619,000. The home has six bedrooms, two bathrooms and solar panels on the dormer. It is set on a 50-by-100-foot lot in the East Williston school district. Amenities include a finished basement, PVC fence and one-car garage. Taxes are $11,573, with an additional village tax of $1,610.

WELLINGTON ROAD, $440,000

With a last asking price of $495,000, this eight-room Colonial sold in February after 136 days on the market. Featuring an open layout and living room with a fireplace, the 1923 home is on a 50-by-115-foot lot within the Mineola school district. A detached two-car garage and formal dining room are among the amenities. Taxes are $9,739, with an additional village tax of $1,641.

FAIRFIELD AVENUE, $372,000

This five-room Cape built in 1920 sold after 87 days on the market. The last asking price was $385,990. The home has three bedrooms, two bathrooms and is on a 45-by-100-foot lot in the Mineola school district. Amenities include an eat-in-kitchen and fireplace. Taxes are $7,140, with an additional village tax of $1,222.