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Historic Stony Brook home has a certain style

This five-bedroom Colonial in Stony Brook, built in

This five-bedroom Colonial in Stony Brook, built in 1941, was designed by architect Richard Haviland Smythe, who put his stamp on many area buildings. (Credit: Handout, 2013)

If this Stony Brook home looks a little familiar, it’s not surprising. The five-bedroom Colonial, built in 1941, was designed by architect Richard Haviland Smythe, who put his stamp on many area buildings when he worked with philanthropist and businessman Ward Melville to rehabilitate historic Stony Brook Village.

Along with the Setauket School and numerous local houses, Smyth designed the nearby Stony Brook Village Center, a collection of shops built around a Federal-style post office and village green. The 2 ½-story home, on the market for $864,000, has been featured twice on the Three Village Historical Society’s annual candlelight house tour. Its arched entryway is similar in style to the arches that accent many of the buildings in the Village Center. Smythe was also known for developing the modern look for Thom McAn shoe stores nationwide.

The architecture of the home is not the only history attached to it. The grounds also overlook the Stony Brook Grist Mill, which was built in 1751 and is now run as a working mill museum by the Ward Melville Heritage Foundation. Across the street is All Souls Episcopal Church, designed by architect Stanford White in 1889.

Seller Elizabeth Greaf, a painter who has her studio in the third-floor dormer, finds plenty of inspiration from the property. “If I turn 360 degrees, I have 360 scenes to paint,” Greaf says.

Carol Russell of Virginia A. O’Dwyer Real Estate is listing the house.

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