Real LI

Buying and selling real estate in the communities of Long Island

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Rich Cribs: Old Brookville 'Pope' manse, and more

This Old Brookville manor has an architect in

This Old Brookville manor has an architect in common with the Jefferson Memorial in Washington, D.C. This Georgian manse, named Eventide, is listed for $4,388,888. (Credit: Handout)

POPE HOUSE. What does a manor house in Old Brookville have in common with the Jefferson Memorial in Washington, D.C.? Both were designed by renowned architect John Russell Pope. In fact, Pope designed many stately homes on Long Island’s Gold Coast.

This Georgian manse, named Eventide, is listed for $4,388,888. It was built in 1934 for “grand-scale entertaining,” says Suzanne Wehren, listing agent with Shawn Elliott Luxury Homes & Estates.

There is an “acoustically enhanced” ballroom and a banquet-size dining room featuring chestnut paneling. Both these rooms and the library and living room have carved wood and marble fireplaces, and 13-foot ceilings with elaborate moldings.

The grand foyer has original hand-painted murals depicting the four seasons. There is a floating staircase as well as an elevator to access the second level. The house has seven bedrooms, six bathrooms and three half-bathrooms. The 8.4-acre property has a traditional walled English boxwood garden. -- Virginia Dunleavy

ARTFUL RENTAL. This Hamptons rental has much more than pristinely manicured hedges. Sagaponack’s Madoo Conservancy, a nonprofit that studies and preserves the gardens and historic structures of artist, gardener and writer Robert Dash, is offering the opportunity to rent the property’s 1855 “winter home” for the summer.

The house is a studio with dining and entertaining space, three bedrooms and a bathroom. There is art throughout, including a bed and a staircase, each made from branches from trees felled by Hurricane Gloria in 1985. The property has a courtyard with an outdoor shower, and the $28,000 fee, plus utilities, for Memorial through Labor Day, includes access to the gardens just outside.

“It’s not a traditional rental by any stretch of the imagination,” says Alejandro Saralegui, director of the Madoo Conservancy. “The great part about it is you’re living essentially in a work of art.”

The home is usually rented by groups of friends or a couple that appreciate the art, flora and history surrounding the property, Saralegui says. “If you want the big Sub-Zero, this isn’t for you.” -- Lisa Chamoff

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