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Rich Cribs: Upper Brookville historic home, and more

Havemeyer estate Colonial in Upper BrookvilleThe circa-1900 brick

Havemeyer estate Colonial in Upper Brookville

The circa-1900 brick structure was expanded and renovated into a five-bedroom, three-bath, one half-bath home. The house has arched wall openings in the original section, including a front entry with leaded glass doorway.The living room and solarium have wood-beamed ceilings. There are wide wood-plank floors and five fireplaces. (Credit: Handout)

LOTS OF HISTORY. An Upper Brookville Colonial, listed for $2.295 million was the former carriage house on Theodore A. Havemeyer’s Cedar Hill estate.

Havemeyer, whose family once ran a sugar refining empire, was president of the Horticultural Society of New York during the late 1920s. He hired a young Martin Viette, of local nursery fame, as apprentice gardener to the estate.

Katherine Cuddeback, listing agent with Daniel Gale Sotheby’s International Realty, says some of the original specimen trees are still on the 5.1-acre property. The circa-1900 brick structure was expanded and renovated into a five-bedroom, three-bath, one half-bath home.

The house has arched wall openings in the original section, including a front entry with leaded glass doorway. The living room and solarium have wood-beamed ceilings. There are wide wood-plank floors and five fireplaces.

A deck off the den borders a large pond used as a swimming hole in the summer and for ice skating in the winter. A second, barnlike building houses an indoor pool and lounge area and a two-car garage.

Other features of the main house include an eat-in kitchen with terra-cotta floor, formal dining room, two en suite master bedrooms, an in-ground gunite pool with brick patio and a tennis court.

According to the Village of Upper Brookville, the property can be subdivided into a two- and three-acre plots. However, the two-acre parcel can only be developed after the existing tennis court, in-ground pool, shed and all related equipment are removed. -- Virginia Dunleavy

OLD GOULD. This Georgian-style mansion in Laurel Hollow, listed for $2.495 million, was built in the 1930s for the grandson of infamous American railroad developer Jay Gould. Cedar Knolls, as it is known, is next to two well-known properties -- the former Tiffany estate, Laurelton, and Cannon Hill, where John Lennon used to summer.

The 29-room house was designed by Noel and Miller, which did the original Greenwich Village location of the Whitney Museum of American Art. The home is believed to have been a speak-easy, says listing agent Maria Lanzisero of Signature Premier Properties.

A door near a main entrance leads to a basement staircase. Downstairs are built-in benches, a bar and a space with a safe door where liquor may have been kept. There also is a room decorated with Alberto Vargas pinup drawings that an auction house came to see. A ballroom in the main part of the house is accessed through French doors. Ceilings at least 10-feet high and hand-laid wood floors complete the trip back in time. -- Nick Divico

Tags: Rich Cribs

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