All you need to do to be certain of the Colonial roots of this Sagaponack home, now on the market for $2.4 million, is look up at the ceiling: There, you'll see a hodgepodge of boards of all shapes, sizes and colors.

Susan Frame, an artist and psychoanalyst who has owned the converted barn, which dates back to the 1740s, since 1997, says the reason is purely functional.

"There would be a leak, and they said, 'Anybody got a board?' And they threw one up. It's a riot to see," she says.

Exposed hand-hewn and doweled beams in the ceiling -- known as rifle-butt, because it is wider at the top to provide additional roof support -- add further rustic charm to what Frame describes as one of Sagaponack's original structures. She says it is also one of the few remaining three-bay horse barns in the style favored by early English settlers.

Six years of renovations, starting in 1997, brought modern heat, air-conditioning and insulation, as well as plenty of light -- something barns notoriously lack, Frame says.

"In the opening that was there for the original barn door, we put in three 10-foot French doors to bring in light from the west frontage," she says. Adding large windows throughout completed the effort; she retained the original slider barn doors.

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Additional vintage touches include a 1930s Magic Chef stove, period-piece furnishings, including an 18th century vestry piece and farm table, and the original hearth, which is large enough to cook in.

The gated residence on four acres also includes a guest cottage, an outdoor shower, numerous patios and a heated swimming pool with a waterfall in the great lawn.

The home is listed with Robert Nelson of Brown Harris Stevens.