Often, a U.S. president’s former house is turned into a museum or landmark. President Donald Trump’s childhood home is about to become a rental.

The Jamaica Estates house, which was auctioned in December, is scheduled to be posted for rent Thursday. Listing agent Jason Friedman of Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage says the rent will be between $3,500 and $4,000 per month.

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“There haven’t been that many presidents, so there’s probably not many opportunities to have rented one of their houses,” Friedman says. “It was an investment property, so no sense in letting it sit idle.”

The five-bedroom, 4 1⁄2 bathroom house is located at 85-15 Wareham Place, the address listed on Trump’s birth certificate. Trump lived in the house, which was built in the 1940s by his developer father, until he was four.

In the span of about six months, the house was sold, then auctioned, and now made available for rent.

Originally placed on the market in July for $1.65 million, the owners decided to take the house to auction during the presidential campaign. They postponed the original auction set for October to capitalize on some late media interest and instead sold the house in December to a real estate investor for the guaranteed sum of $1,390,500. The investor then auctioned the house in January for $2.14 million. The 2,500-square foot Tudor, which sits on a 40-by-120-foot lot, also has an eat-in kitchen, formal dining room, full finished basement and two-car garage.

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Friedman says the house will be rented on a one-year lease and that he has not yet discussed the terms of a security deposit. The rental price, he adds, is comparable to a house of similar size in the location.

On the Multiple Listing Service of Long Island website, there are 10 rentals listed in Jamaica Estates, with co-ops and apartments ranging from $1,350 to $3,500 and whole house rentals from $2,250 to $4,600.

Friedman says he expects the house to rent quickly and is “curious to see if it rents as a normal rental or someone is going to pay a major premium just because it’s Trump’s house.”

After the auction, there was some thought that the owners might turn the house into a museum. Instead, the owners will become landlords.

“I think they bought it because they wanted the house,” Friedman says. “I don’t think it was with any intention to resell or do anything like that. I think it was a collectible for them. As far as landmarking it or making it into a museum, I think that was more other people talking about that as I guess they have done with other president’s houses. I don’t think that’s the goal of the buyer.

“I don’t know if they’re ever going to sell it. They may have just bought it as a trophy piece they want to keep forever.”