The names -- and nicknames -- in the news

Anthony Weiner speaks to the media after courting

Anthony Weiner speaks to the media after courting voters outside a Harlem subway station a day after announcing he will enter the New York mayoral race on in Manhattan. (May 23, 2013) (Credit: Getty Images)

The baby is George. The texter is Carlos. The juror is B29.

It's true, no book can ever be judged by its cover. But we all reveal ourselves eventually by the names that we chose -- or the names that are chosen for us.

Prince William and Kate didn't give their newborn just any old name. He is George Alexander Louis, His Royal Highness Prince George of Cambridge. Strong. Sensitive. Regal. Historic. If that's not a name for a prince to live up to, then nothing is.

At the other end of the breaking-news name-game, juror B29 from the George Zimmerman trial stepped in the shadows of day. You can't say the light of day. Despite her bold pronouncement -- Trayvon Martin's killer "got away with murder" -- the outspoken juror clung to own combination of semi-anonymity. She called herself "Maddy," which must be some kind of nickname, and B29, which could be a vitamin.

Then we have New York mayoral candidate and social media enthusiast Anthony Weiner. Not satisfied with one unfortunate name, he has taken on another. Even after he resigned from Congress over his Twitter scandal in 2011, it seems, he was sexting young female admirers under the digital nom de amor "Carlos Danger."

Clearly a man who likes to live dangerously, he was accentuating rakishness that previously only he could see.

Which comes first: The man drops out of the mayor's race? Or he starts introducing himself, "Danger, Carlos Danger?"

It's all in the name.

NAMING RIGHTS

1. Name game

2. Maiden name

3. Boldface name

4. Name this tune

5. Household name

ASKED AND UNANSWERED: A seven-day contract with the WNBA's New York Liberty for ex-Commack point guard Samantha Prahalis? With the records she's shattered, why not seven years? . . . Who will do most of the scooting on the LIRR's proposed "scoot trains"? Post-car Long Islanders? Or Brooklyn and Queens people grateful for the extra service between Flatbush and Jamaica? Set to launch with East Side Access in 2019, any chance the scoots could scoot here any more quickly than that? . . . Where do the Sound's in-breeding winter flounder think they are? Some backwater somewhere? . . . Now that Gov. Cuomo has banned their sale and possession, where can I keep my shark fins? Next to my elephant tusks and black-rhino horns? . . . Higher fines for distracted drivers? You're gonna wait to get home to text your friends about that? . . . How lucky was the pilot of a single-engine Beechcraft Bonanza on Friday to survive a nose-first landing at ISP with disengaged landing gear? Who's he been taking lessons from? A certain Southwest pilot at LaGuardia? . . . How is "Cutthroat Kitchen," Alton Brown's new Food Network show, any different from just a normal night in LI's highly competitive restaurant world? Marc Weiss, aka DJ Chef (George Martin, Tuscany, Coyote Grill) stars in both . . . Has LIPA weighed in on Shelter Island's turn-out-the-lights ordinance? Vowing to "preserve our dark skies while we still have them," when will Supervisor James Dougherty see the light?

THE NEWS IN SONG: I wanna know who you are and make you a star: "What's Your Name" by Usher and Will.I.Am, tinyurl.com/wachaname.

LONG ISLANDER OF THE WEEK: PETER FIGOSKI

There are many ways to remember a fallen hero. Few of them are as lasting as this. Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo just signed a bill naming a span across Sunrise Highway in West Babylon the "New York City Police Department Detective Peter Figoski Memorial Bridge." Figoski, who lived nearby, was killed in Brooklyn responding to a 2011 robbery. His name will not be forgotten soon.

Email Ellis@henican.com

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