Douglas Kennedy doctor friend testifies that nurses overreacted

Douglas Kennedy leaves the Mount Kisco courthouse. (June

Douglas Kennedy leaves the Mount Kisco courthouse. (June 14, 2012) (Credit: John Meore)

A doctor who is a friend of Douglas Kennedy said he thought nurses overreacted to Kennedy's attempt to take his baby outside Northern Westchester Hospital, kicking off the Jan. 7 fracas that led to criminal charges against Kennedy.

Dr. Timothy Haydock, an emergency room physician at the hospital, was on the maternity ward that night and said he told Kennedy it was fine for Kennedy, 45, to take his 2-day-old son, Anthony Boru, outside to look at the moon.

"I thought Northern Westchester was a hospital, not a prison," he said Thursday as he testified in Kennedy's defense.


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Two maternity nurses accuse Kennedy, 45, of roughing them up during a scuffle as they tried to prevent him from taking the child off the ward without proper permission and safely tucked in a bassinet.

Haydock said nurse Anna Lane -- who accused Kennedy of twisting her arm to remove her from a doorway -- reacted aggressively, threatening to call a code pink on Kennedy, the hospital's code for a kidnapped child.

The trial is expected to wrap up Friday in Mount Kisco Justice Court. It's unclear when Judge John Donohue will render his verdict in the nonjury trial. Kennedy is charged with child endangerment and physical harassment. In addition to being accused of twisting Lane's arm, Kennedy is charged with kicking nurse Cari Luciano so hard she flew across a hospital hallway.

Prosecutors from the Westchester County district attorney's office rested their case Wednesday in the trial.

Kennedy faces up to a year in jail if convicted.

His lawyer, Robert Gottlieb, asked Thursday afternoon that charges be dropped before he called Haydock to the stand.

Donohue denied the motion. It is a motion that is commonly made by defendants after prosecutors rest their case and one that is rarely granted.

Gottlieb has not said whether he would call Kennedy, 45, who lives in Chappaqua with his wife, Molly, and five kids, to testify Friday on his own behalf.

Kennedy has pleaded not guilty, and his lawyers have painted the nurses as hungry for money and fame, saying they were using Kennedy's name to get on national television and to get cash from him.

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