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The novel: (Credit: Handout )

The novel: "The Legend of Sleepy Hollow" (1917)
The author: Washington Irving
The setting: It was in the Dutch settlement Tarry town (now known as Tarrytown) that poor Ichabod Crane lost his head to the Headless Horseman.

16 novels set in Westchester County

Westchester County has served as an inspiration for legendary authors such as Washington Irving, John Cheever and E.L. Doctorow, as well as present-day literary talents.

From wars (both real and imaginary) to suburban angst, the area's picturesque beauty and historic significance have led to a substantial number of novels being based here.

Here's a look at 16 works of fiction set in Westchester County, presented chronologically.

Compiled by Kirthana Ramisetti

The novel: “The Spy: A Tale of the
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The novel: “The Spy: A Tale of the Neutral Ground” (1821)
The author: James Fenimore Cooper
The setting: Westchester County was the “neutral ground” of the book’s title, and many of the Revolutionary War battles recounted in the novel were set in the area.

The novel:
(Credit: Handout )

The novel: "The Legend of Sleepy Hollow" (1917)
The author: Washington Irving
The setting: It was in the Dutch settlement Tarry town (now known as Tarrytown) that poor Ichabod Crane lost his head to the Headless Horseman.

The novel: “Fer-de-Lance” (1934) The author: Max Stout
(Credit: Handout )

The novel: “Fer-de-Lance” (1934)
The author: Max Stout
The setting: In the very first novel in the famous Nero Wolfe mystery series, the detective investigates a murder on a Westchester County golf course.

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The novel:
(Credit: Handout)

The novel: "The Brigadier and the Golf Widow" (1964)
The author: John Cheever
The setting: These short stories of loneliness and malaise are set in an upper-class suburbia reminiscent of Westchester County. This collection includes Cheever’s most famous short story, “The Swimmer.”

The novel: “Ragtime” (1975) The author: E.L. Doctorow
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The novel: “Ragtime” (1975)
The author: E.L. Doctorow
The setting: The wealthy family at the novel’s center (known simply as Mother, Father, The Little Boy, etc.) live in New Rochelle; White Plains and Rye are referenced in the novel as well.

The novel: “World's End” (1987) The author: T.
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The novel: “World's End” (1987)
The author: T. Coraghessan Boyle
The setting: The novel follows three Hudson Valley-based families over the course of three centuries. Peekskill appears as ''Peterskill'' in the book.

The novel: “The Plagiarist” (1994) The author: Ben
(Credit: Handout)

The novel: “The Plagiarist” (1994)
The author: Ben Cheever
The setting:The protagonist works at the world headquarters of The American Reader in the fictional town of Paradise, a setting that closely parallels Reader's Digest, which is based in Pleasantville.

The novel: “Mona in the Promised Land” (1997)
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The novel: “Mona in the Promised Land” (1997)
The author: Gish Jen
The setting: The Chinese-American protagonist and her family adjust to living in affluent “Scarshill,” reflecting the author’s experience growing up in Scarsdale.

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The novel: “How I Wonder What You Are”
(Credit: Handout )

The novel: “How I Wonder What You Are” (2001)
The author: Louise Lynch
The setting: This children’s book is set in Chestnut Knoll, a fictionalized version of the author’s hometown of Larchmont.

The novel: “World War Z” (2006) The author:
(Credit: Handout)

The novel: “World War Z” (2006)
The author: Max Brooks
The setting: In this postapocalyptic horror novel, a climactic battle between U.S. armed forces and zombies takes place in Yonkers. (Spoiler alert: The zombies win.)

The novel: “How to Talk to a Widower”
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The novel: “How to Talk to a Widower” (2007)
The author: Jonathan Tropper
The setting: The titular widower lives in a fictional town called New Radford that is “100 percent New Rochelle,” according to the author.

The novel: “Jane Austen in Scarsdale: Or Love,
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The novel: “Jane Austen in Scarsdale: Or Love, Death, and the SATs” (2007)
The author: Paula Marantz Cohen
The setting: The title is pretty self-explanatory: Austen’s classic novel “Persuasion” is reimagined and set in modern-day Scarsdale.

The novel: “Home School” (2008) The author: Charles
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The novel: “Home School” (2008)
The author: Charles Webb
The setting: In this sequel to “The Graduate,” Ben and Elaine have left California and Mrs. Robinson behind and settled down with their sons in Westchester County.

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The novel:
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The novel: "Kill You Last" (2011)
The author: Todd Strasser
The setting: Teens are going missing from Soundview, a fictionalized version of the Larchmont area, in this final book from Strasser’s young adult "thrill-ology."

The novel: “The Clique” (14-book series, the final
(Credit: Handout)

The novel: “The Clique” (14-book series, the final book came out in February 2012)
The author: Lisi Harrison
The setting: The bestselling young adult series about a clique called The Pretty Committee takes place at the fictional Octavian Country Day School, which is set in Westchester County.

The novel: “The Sleepy Hollow Family Almanac” (2012)
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The novel: “The Sleepy Hollow Family Almanac” (2012)
The author: Kris D'Agostino
The setting: A grad school dropout moves back to Sleepy Hollow to live with his dysfunctional family.

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