If you're reading this on April Fools' Day, you're on some type of computer or mobile device. And if you're on some type of computer or mobile device, you've probably Googled something today.

Or should I say, "Topeka'ed" something.

Google is just one of several major companies on board with the holiday. It "changed" its name to Topeka, after the Kansas capital actually did change its name to Google for the month of March.

Topeka made the move in an effort to persuade the popular search engine company to test its speedy new broadband project in its community. (Several cities nationwide have applied, but Google has yet to announce the winners).

Aside from its Web site, Google even changed some signage at its headquarters. Go ahead, "Topeka" it if you don't believe us.

Some other April Fools' Day pranks that caught our eye:

-- Starbucks introduced two 'new' sizes to coffee lovers. In an April 1 spoof, it announced the arrival of 128-ounce "Plenta" and 2-ounce "Micra" cups. They even had pictures showing the monstrous and mini drinks.

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-- FunnyorDie.com also tricked its daily readers who were looking for laughs. It Justin Bieber-ized its homepage. Readers were no doubt horrified to see the 16-year-old pop star starring in every video on its site. I'm guessing Funny Or Die's target audience is slightly older than Bieber's.

-- YouTube's prank of choice was an announcement that they were offering videos in word format, in a "cost-cutting measure."

-- Collegehumor.com told its devoted readers that it is storing your IP address and sharing it with the "United States Department of Information under the Civilian Surveillance Act (Art. 3, s8, cl. 8, Cong. 109th, Sess. 3, 2005)."

It went on to say that its site was under investigation for "harboring un-American sentiment and will remain offline until an official review can be conducted. You are not under arrest nor have you broken any United States laws by attempting to visit WWW.COLLEGEHUMOR.COM, however, the Department of Information may subpoena your address from your Internet Service Provider for further action."

-- Joel McHale from E!'s The Soup has taken over Ryan Seacrest's Twitter account and Web site. On @RyanSeacrest, McHale has tweeted such gems as "Know the difference between me and Ryan? About 2 feet 3 inches. That should be obvious." Meanwhile, over at ryanseacrest.com, McHale has built a virtual shrine to his own work, including a YouTube video of his brief cameo in Spider-Man 2.

What are some of your favorite pranks of the day? Tell us in the comments below.

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