HOME FIRE, by Kamila Shamsie. This modern retelling of Sophocles’ “Antigone” is the story of three British Muslim siblings: responsible Isma, who comes to the United States to study; headstrong Anneeka, back in London; and brother Parvaiz, who has joined the jihad in Syria. The novel, Shamsie’s seventh, is longlisted for the Man Booker Prize. (Riverhead, $26)

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GOOD BOOTY: Love and Sex, Black and White, Body and Soul in American Music, by Ann Powers. The NPR music critic writes a history of American popular music, sex and race, starting in the melting pot of 19th century New Orleans and ending with Beyoncé and the release of “Lemonade.” Along the way, she considers the examples of Little Richard, Jim Morrison, David Bowie, Donna Summer, Madonna, Britney Spears and Miley Cyrus. (Dey Street Books, $26.99)

THE WORLD BROKE IN TWO: Virginia Woolf, T.S. Eliot, D.H. Lawrence, E.M. Forster and the Year That Changed Literature, by Bill Goldstein. That would be 1922 — the year that Joyce’s “Ulysses” was published, and Proust’s “In Search of Lost Time” first appeared in English. The author, who reviews books on NBC’s “Weekend Today,” looks at that turning point for four major authors who would shape literary Modernism. (Henry Holt, $30)