An extended version of last week’s 911 call from Kanye West’s doctor requesting help for the troubled rapper displays concern over the possibility of violence.

“You’re his doctor, sir, is that correct?” a dispatcher asks in the nearly minute-and-a-half edited excerpt posted Thursday by the Los Angeles Times and other outlets.

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“Yeah, I’m just calling — I’m actually one of his doctors — I’m just calling from my cellphone,” Dr. Michael Farzam replies. The physician requests “some police backup because I don’t think the paramedics” alone would suffice, and adds, “If you can bring both, yes, I think he’s definitely going to need to be hospitalized, so I wouldn’t just do the police by itself.”

When the dispatcher asks a pro forma question as to whether there are “any weapons involved, or in the area?” the doctor replies no. After talk between what seems like the dispatcher and first responders, the dispatcher instructs Farzam, “OK, sir, if you could just keep an eye on him. . . . Don’t let him get any weapons or anything like that. If anything changes, if he does become physically combative between now and when the police and/or paramedics get there, call us back immediately at 911.”

Farzam replies, “Will do. Thank you so much.”

Emergency responders arrived at about 1:20 p.m. Nov. 21 at the home of West’s trainer, Harley Pasternak, in the 900 block of North Laurel Avenue in L.A.’s Beverly Grove neighborhood. TMZ.com, quoting a police report, said Farzam had placed the rapper on a 5150 psychiatric hold, referring to a section of the California Welfare and Institutions Code under which someone exhibiting a “mental disorder” can be brought in “for 72-hour treatment and evaluation.”

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Two days earlier, West had arrived late to a Sacramento concert, and soon after the show began he launched into a stream-of-consciousness tirade before leaving the stage and cutting short the show. He soon canceled the remainder of his Saint Pablo tour, which had been set to conclude Dec. 30 and 31 at Brooklyn’s Barclays Center. He was released from the Resnick Neuropsychiatric Hospital at UCLA Medical Center earlier this week.