Philip Seymour Hoffman leaves bulk of estate to longtime girlfriend

Actor Philip Seymour Hoffman backstage at the 63rd

Actor Philip Seymour Hoffman backstage at the 63rd Annual Golden Globe Awards with his award for best actor, drama for "Capote" at the Beverly Hilton on Jan. 16, 2006 in Beverly Hills, Calif. (Credit: Getty Images / Kevin Winter)

Actor Philip Seymour Hoffman left the bulk of his estate to the mother of his three children and expressed a desire that his son be raised in a place with culture like New York City, according to his will filed in Manhattan Surrogate's Court.

Under the provisions of the will that Hoffman signed on Oct. 7, 2004, his longtime girlfriend Marianne O'Donnell also is to be the executor of his estate -- valued at more than $500,000. If she desires, she can renounce any part of her inheritance. If O'Donnell renounces her rights, the property will go into a trust fund for his eldest child, Cooper, who was born in 2004.

Hoffman also said that he wanted Cooper to be raised in Manhattan, San Francisco or Chicago so that he could partake of "the culture, arts and architecture that such cities offer," the will stated.


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Hoffman died Feb. 2 in a West Village apartment on Bethune Street, apparently of a heroin overdose.

The Academy Award-winning actor's two other children with O'Donnell are Tallulah, 7, and Willa, 5.

The younger children, born after the 2004 will, were not expressly provided for in the document. But court papers show they live with their mother and that Hoffman's assets were needed for the support of the children and their mother.

The 16-page will has an intricate trust fund provision that takes effect if O'Donnell renounces her inheritance or if she had died before him. The trust would benefit Cooper to pay for his support and education. Cooper also would be entitled to half of the principal of the trust once he reaches the age of 25, the will stated.

Hoffman also had a provision in the will stating that if Cooper became the owner of his father's West Village condominium at Sheridan Square that he either live there or lease it.

O'Donnell was issued preliminary authority Wednesday by Surrogate Rita Mella to begin acting as executor.

Susan P. Witkin, an attorney representing O'Donnell, said in a court filing that Hoffman's apartment had been sealed since his death by the NYPD and that some of his personal effects were being held by police.

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