Keith Moser and his 22-year-old son, Dylan, bond best to the sound of an engine roar.

Moser, 59, has spent decades working in the machine industry, and his gear-head tendencies seem to be hereditary.

Father and son have made a habit of restoring vintage and antique motorcycles since the elder Moser retired at 48. Even when they leave the garage, the Mosers spend most of their time scouring the Internet or automotive shows and vehicle lots for classic motorcycle models.

“I go to shows all over the country,” says Moser, a Shirley resident who owns 20 motorcycles. “I have a Rolodex with collectors in Australia, Europe, California, Florida and beyond.”

On Sunday, May 22, Moser will showcase some of his fascinating finds from around the world at the Celebration of Vintage Transportation show at Bayport Aerodrome Society.

“This show is unique in that people will see things in their original state or close to what they would have looked like when they left the factory,” says Moser, president of the Antique Motorcycle Club of America.

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The daylong event will feature vintage and antique aircrafts, automobiles and motorcycles — a combination that is a rarity in itself.

SECOND TIME AROUND

The 2015 event was the first on Long Island to combine vintage cars, cycles and planes, Moser says.

He and the other event organizers say they hope to drive home the idea that it is important to pay homage to history — as it relates to what was once in the sky and on the roads.

The Bayport Aerodrome, where the event will take place for the second year in a row, will raffle off biplane rides during the event. The museum is the last remaining public grass airfield on Long Island dedicated to preserving aviation history. At least 30 airplanes will be accessible on Sunday.

“As far as the airplanes go, the aerodrome will have three or four active biplanes that were used during World War II,” Moser says.

Some of these highflying aircrafts were very colorful and had two cockpits, according to Moser.

Arthur Gould, president of the Vanderbilt chapter of the Antique Automobile Club of America, a co-sponsor of the event, says Sunday’s show will feature more than 60 cars built between the 1920s and ’70s. Guests can peer inside the cars and even take some out for a test drive — which Moser believes is a major draw.

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“How many kids have had a chance to drive around in a 1909 Cadillac?” he asks.

A fair share of owners will showcase their British, Indian and Honda motorcycles, Studebakers, BMW cars, early incarnations of the still-popular Italian-made Isetta, as well as “some oddball stuff” like a 1940s motorscooter manufactured from 1938 to 1946, Moser says.

Gould, 74, has taken part in dozens of vintage car shows and spent decades as a collector.

Despite the modern amenities of today’s rides, he says, antique and classic models still appeal to a large swath of car enthusiasts.

Last year’s event attracted hundreds, despite a severe snowstorm.

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“People like to see old stuff,” Gould says. “We bring it to them.”