Quick, you’ve put together a film crew, and you’ve been given a genre and a few instructions. Now, you’ve got only two days to assemble actors, conceive, shoot, edit, mix a soundtrack and complete your film. That was the challenge for budding Spielbergs in the Cinema Arts Centre’s fourth annual 48-Hour Film Competition.

On Tuesday, Aug. 30, you’ll be able to watch the results.

This year, seven films are in competition, plus one not in contention by Rene Bouchard, 47, director of development for Cinema Arts Centre, who took on the challenge for fun.

THE RULES

Each film runs between one and five minutes and includes a character named Dodo Bellacourt (from Comedy Central’s “Another Period”), the line “Nothing worse than dealing with a staunch woman . . . S-T-A-U-N-C-H” (from the film “Grey Gardens”) and a vending machine toy as a prop.

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Among the genres are shock ending, mockumentary, end of the world, religious and race against the clock.

The winner, who will receive $500, will be announced after all eight films are screened at the theater. The selected film also will be shown before every feature at Cinema Arts Centre from Sept. 9 to 15.

MEET THE FILMMAKERS

For Steven Murello, 17, of East Islip, who’s wanted to be a filmmaker since the fifth grade, logistics can be daunting.

“I’m a teenager, and getting other teenagers together can be very difficult. Teens never know what they’re doing,” Murello says. “You have to be flexible.”

Indeed, with the blistering heat over the filming weekend — Friday, Aug. 12, at 7 p.m. to Sunday, Aug. 14, at 6:59 p.m. — flexibility was necessary for the creation of at least some of the films in competition.

“There was definitely some dehydration,” notes Stefan Beaumont, 28, of Hampton Bays, founder and director of photography for Red Vault Productions. Capitalizing on the river breezes, Beaumont’s team did one scene near the Peconic for “He Is Always Watching,” a fantasy adventure about a man down on his luck.

Working on an ultratight deadline, Beaumont says, is “creatively stimulating. . . . It’s pretty much running and gunning.”

Heat proved a factor for Paper Monster Productions, which completed its apocalyptic tale in the incongruous romantic comedy category with plenty of time to spare.

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“We knew we had to opt for an indoor shoot due to heat and control of daylight hours; passing of time,” says Christine Fitzgerald, 34, of Centereach, who partnered with her husband, Sean, 39, on “Outbreak-Up.”

Working in the doppelgänger category, Team DiLos, a team of three undergrad film students, submitted its movie within five minutes of cutoff time.

“It is a bit eclectic and perhaps a bit raunchy,” says filmmaker Rose Kelso, 19, of Stony Brook, about “Doppelbänger,” the story of a man with too much time on his hands who learns he has a double who is an adult film star. Note: There’s a plot twist at the end.

“Worry,” Bouchard’s paranormal opus, was truly a family affair. Working on the concept with her 11-year-old son, Garrison, Bouchard, of Huntington Station, got an assist from her husband, Cliff Ferdon, 43, who put some finishing touches on the piece.

“We had so much fun — we want to do it next year!” says Bouchard, a film buff and musician.

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Matt Greenberg, 23, of Commack, who won last year’s competition for “Breathe,” conjectures that, among other elements, the key to his film’s success was telling a human story with mysterious and claustrophobic visuals, coupled with the effective use of a stirring cello solo.

As one of the seven judges for the competition, filmmaker Glenn Andreiev, 55, of Kings Park will be looking for imagination and creativity.

“Make the viewer want to see the film again,” he advises.