The dancing won’t be dirty, but the cast and ensuing ensembles will be titanic. And yes, that means they’re bringing “Baby” back and not putting her in the corner.

Some of the most memorable musical moments from the silver screen will be remixed and performed live on stage as part of “Dance to the Movies” at Patchogue Theatre Aug. 10-14.

WHO’S ON STAGE

Current and former pros from popular reality television shows “Dancing With the Stars” and “So You Think You Can Dance” will deliver reinvented routines to scores from such movies as “Dirty Dancing,” “West Side Story,” “Grease,” “Chicago,” “Singin’ in the Rain,” “Moulin Rouge,” “Titanic,” “The Matrix” and “Harry Potter.”

The cast of the two-hour production includes Karina Smirnoff, Lacey Schwimmer, Tristan MacManus, Chelsie Hightower and Jonathan Roberts of “Dancing With the Stars” fame; “So You Think You Can Dance” alums Jonathan “Legacy” Perez and Hailee Payne, and “American Idol” powerhouse finalists Vonzell Solomon and Von Smith. Film and television star Lesley Ann Warren will also make her debut at Patchogue Theatre.

ABOUT THE MUSIC

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“It’s the joy of movie dances — these classic songs are the soundtrack of our lives and these are dances that we will never forget,” says Schwimmer, who choreographed the show with “Dancing With the Stars” cast mate Anna Trebunskaya and “So You Think You Can Dance” finalist James Tuaileva. “I like to think of them as memory jewels.”

The stars will shake, shimmy and sway through the decades in costumes from these famed productions while incorporating ballroom, cha-cha, salsa and hip-hop dance styles.

”The songs were selected by the producers and choreographers,” Schwimmer says, and are either “what they thought were iconic songs from movies or what they personally had a connection to.”

Schwimmer, who placed fourth on the second season of “So You Think You Can Dance,” says she is partial to the “All That Jazz” ensemble because she choreographed it.

“All of the songs make you remember a time, a place or an emotion you had at that particular moment when you saw that film,” Schwimmer says.

Smirnoff competed on 18 seasons of “Dancing With the Stars.” She says reality television is no comparison to live performances.

“On TV, we have an audience in the ballroom, but you always keep in mind that you are also performing for the audience at home,” says Smirnoff, a Mirror Ball Trophy winner who will perform only in the weekend shows. “But with live theater productions, it’s always about connecting with the audience right there.”

“Dance to the Movies” makes building this “connection” a priority by providing opportunities for audience participation. And it is thanks to shows like “Dancing With the Stars” that dancers are having their day, she says.

“I think dancing has always been very popular; it’s just that in the last several decades, it took more of a backseat and became a backup act for artists,” Smirnoff says. “But now, dancers are artists of their own and you don’t need to have a performer, necessarily, to have a dancer perform. You can have a dancer do his own thing or her own thing and it’s an act of its own.”