What could be more fun than watching a bunch of incredibly athletic-looking men dressed in women’s tutus and tights gracefully pirouetting en pointe around a stage?

For more than four decades, the dancers of Les Ballets Trockadero de Monte Carlo have been bringing joy to audiences around the world as they sashay and prance about the stage with choreographed high jinks, nimble-footed antics and an undeniable joie de vivre.

Now, the self-described “world’s foremost all-male comic ballet company” is coming to the Westhampton Beach Performing Arts Center Saturday night for a couple of hours of nonstop artistry laced with lots of giggle-inducing silliness.

The dancers, who play both male and female roles, combine irrepressible humor with true talent, says Erin Young, executive assistant at the performing arts center.

“Make no mistake, these are classically trained ballet dancers, but the Trockaderos are known for their comedic parodies,” Young says. “While they are skilled, classically trained dancers, the content is designed for maximum fun.”

Unique in the world of dancing troupes, Les Ballets will perform a number of pieces from its extensive repertoire of classic ballet dances. Dances to look for are Camille Saint-Saëns’ “The Dying Swan,” featuring an artful, albeit melodramatic, feather-shedding, ever-so-slowly dying swan; Cesare Pugni’s “La Esmeralda,” in which dancers performing a pas de six on stage are distracted by an impatient dancer loudly munching on an apple in the wings, and “Swan Lake,” complete with mimed theatrics and pratfalls that add a light touch to Tchaikovsky’s otherwise somber ballet.

The group has come a long way since it was founded in 1974 by Peter Anastos, Natch Taylor and Antony Bassae and performed its first show at a second-story loft in Manhattan’s Meatpacking District. Since then, Les Ballets has danced at prestigious venues such as the Joyce Theater in Manhattan and in 2008 performed for Prince Charles in England.

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Employing wonderfully exaggerated emotion and over-the-top, thickly layered makeup, the 14-man troupe brings the rarefied world of ballet down to earth.

Adds Young, “They are masters of parody and the art of ballet, a combination that should not be missed.”