Alice Cooper's 'doc opera,' 'Super Duper Alice Cooper,' premiering at Tribeca Film Festival

Alice Cooper performs on June 27, 2012 at

Alice Cooper performs on June 27, 2012 at the Nikon Theater at Jones Beach in Wantagh. (Credit: Agaton Strom)

WHO Alice Cooper

THE MOVIE "Super Duper Alice Cooper"

THE DEAL The famous horror-rocker is the subject of what's being called a "doc opera" that tells his life story with a mix of archival footage, interviews and animation. Discussing Cooper's long career -- from his upstart years in the 1960s through his glam-rock comeback in the '80s and up to the present -- are fellow musicians such as Elton John, Iggy Pop, Dee Snider and John Lydon. The movie will premiere at the Tribeca Film Festival, which runs April 16-27.

 

WHO Octavia Spencer

THE DEAL The Oscar-winning star of "The Help" has lost her bid to sue a diet-product company she once endorsed, according to The Hollywood Reporter. Part of the actress' disagreement with California-based company Sensa stems from her tweeted endorsements, which included the hashtag #spon, short for "sponsored." That hashtag is a disclosure required by the Federal Trade Commission, but Spencer's suit suggested that the company didn't like it and used it as an excuse to withhold $700,000 owed to her. Spencer's contract with Sensa required her to lose 20 pounds and submit to mandatory weigh-ins. A Los Angeles judge tossed out her suit, but a related trial is set for Oct. 27.

 

WHO Marlene Dietrich

THE DEAL A surreal letter to the German screen siren, written by writer Ernest Hemingway in 1955, is set to go on sale later this month through the website AuctionMyStuff, according to The Hollywood Reporter. In the steamy but decidedly strange letter, written during the filming of John Sturges' 1958 adaptation of Hemingway's "The Old Man and the Sea," Hemingway envisions acting with Dietrich, "drunk and naked" in a stage show involving a giant rubber whale. "You are foaming at the mouth of course to show that we are really acting," Hemingway writes, "and we bottle the foam and sell it to any surviving customers." The auction includes 250 pieces of Dietrich's belongings that were left to her grandchildren.

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