Best new movies available On Demand

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"Gold," "The Founder" and more: See film critic Rafer Guzman's picks for the Oscar winners, box office hits and independent films that are available (or will be soon) to watch On Demand, whether you subscribe to Optimum, Time Warner Cable, DirecTV, Dish or Verizon. Dates of availability may vary based on provider.

"The Wall"

John Cena and Aaron Taylor-Johnson are soldiers pinned
(Credit: AP)

John Cena and Aaron Taylor-Johnson are soldiers pinned down by a sniper in Iraq. There's not a lot of meat on this two-man thriller, but it offers impressively tense moments.

"Their Finest"

During World War II, a Welsh woman joins
(Credit: STX Entertainment / Nicola Dove)

During World War II, a Welsh woman joins Britain's propaganda efforts as a screenwriter. The period backdrop is fascinating and richly detailed, but the characters, alas, are too vaguely drawn to hold our interest. With Sam Claflin and Richard E. Grant. Read our review here.

"Bad Santa 2"

Billy Bob Thornton returns in the title role
(Credit: Jan Thijs)

Billy Bob Thornton returns in the title role of reprobate mall-Santa Willie Soke, with Tony Cox as his elfin helpmate. Not as good as the original by a long shot, but the quick-witted cast (including Kathy Bates as Willie's criminal mom) has moments of near-brilliance. Read our review here.

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"Fences"

Director Denzel Washington got an Oscar nod for
(Credit: David Lee)

Director Denzel Washington got an Oscar nod for his performance as a working-class patriarch in this adaptation of the August Wilson play. Viola Davis, as a beleaguered wife, took home the gold. Read our review here.

"A Monster Calls"

A preteen boy (Lewis MacDougall) with a dying
(Credit: Focus Features)

A preteen boy (Lewis MacDougall) with a dying mother (Felicity Jones) receives a visit from an ancient monster. Well-crafted and deep-reaching, but also profoundly sad, which makes it tough to recommend to its young target audience. Read our review here.

"Hidden Figures"

(Credit: 20th Century Fox Film / Hopper Stone)

One of last year's best films, about three brilliant black women working for NASA in the 1960s, is both a "message movie" and an upbeat crowd-pleaser. Taraji P. Henson, Octavia Spencer (who earned an Oscar nomination) and Janelle Monae make for a dynamite trio. Based on true stories. Read our review here.

"La La Land"

Ryan Gosling and Emma Stone play Los Angeles
(Credit: AP)

Ryan Gosling and Emma Stone play Los Angeles dreamers in this original musical, which won six Oscars and a record-setting seven Golden Globes. Despite the hype, this is no "Singin' in the Rain," but it has style to burn and two undeniably charismatic stars. Read our review here.

"The Girl on the Train"

The bestselling novel is now a movie starring
(Credit: DreamWorks Pictures)

The bestselling novel is now a movie starring Emily Blunt as an alcoholic who begins to investigate a possible murder. Blunt's performance is convincing, but the rest of the movie is contrived, oversexed and tacky. With Rebecca Ferguson. Read our review here.

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"Frantz"

Shortly after World War I, a mysterious Frenchman
(Credit: Music Box Films / Jean-Claude Moireau-Foz)

Shortly after World War I, a mysterious Frenchman arrives in a small German town and claims to have been friends with a local fallen soldier. It's an interesting glimpse into Europe's post-war divisions, but the zigzagging plot lacks a satisfying conclusion. With Paula Beer and Pierre Niney. Read our review here.

"The Space Between Us"

An interplanetary romance about a sheltered boy on
(Credit: STX Entertainment / Jack English)

An interplanetary romance about a sheltered boy on Mars (Asa Butterfield) and a cynical Earth girl (Britt Robertson). Some rewarding moments of teenage drama and on-the-lam action, but the clunky plot keeps this movie from ever truly taking off. Read our review here.

"Personal Shopper"

Kristen Stewart plays the assistant to a European
(Credit: IFC Films / Carole Bethuel)

Kristen Stewart plays the assistant to a European fashion model in this odd story about a possible ghost and a very real murder. What it all means isn't clear, but it's a suspenseful and tingly thriller. Read our review here.

"Beauty and the Beast"

Disney's live-action fairy tale doesn't measure up to
(Credit: Disney)

Disney's live-action fairy tale doesn't measure up to the 1991 animated classic -- few films could -- but Emma Watson makes for an appealing Belle while Dan Stevens gives The Beast a human touch. Emma Thompson replaces Angela Lansbury as the voice of the grandmotherly teapot, Mrs. Potts. Read our review here.

"Fifty Shades Darker"

The sequel to
(Credit: AP)

The sequel to "Fifty Shades of Grey," starring Jamie Dornan as sadistic billionaire Christian Grey, tries to crank up the kink factor, but mostly proves that its ostensibly innocent heroine, Anastasia Steele (Dakota Johnson), is actually a calculating gold digger who'll do just about anything for money. Read our review here.

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"Split"

The latest from M. Night Shyamalan is an
(Credit: AP)

The latest from M. Night Shyamalan is an entertaining little thriller about a kidnapper (James McAvoy) with 23 personalities. The movie certainly makes the most of its star, while Anya Taylor-Joy ("The Witch") is quietly compelling as a hostage with a secret. Read our review here.

"Life"

Jake Gyllenhaal, Rebecca Ferguson and Ryan Reynolds star
(Credit: Columbia Pictures / Courtesy of Sony Pictures)

Jake Gyllenhaal, Rebecca Ferguson and Ryan Reynolds star in a sci-fi horror film about a highly efficient life-form that enters a spaceship and begins killing the crew. Ever seen a movie called "Alien"? No need to see this one, then. Read our review here.

"John Wick: Chapter 2"

Here are four words you rarely hear about
(Credit: AP)

Here are four words you rarely hear about a sequel: better than the first. Keanu Reeves, returning as a ruthless hit man, is aided by a confident filmmaking team (director Chad Stahelski and writer Derek Kolstad) that cranks up the action and doubles down on the fantasy elements. Also starring Common and the always-welcome Ian McShane. Read our review here.

"Patriots Day"

A riveting dramatization of the Boston Marathon bombings
(Credit: CBS Films / Karen Ballard)

A riveting dramatization of the Boston Marathon bombings and the subsequent manhunt. The expert action director Peter Berg ("Deepwater Horizon") is firing on all cylinders with this one. Starring Mark Wahlberg and J.K. Simmons. Read our review here.

"Rock Dog"

An animated film about a Tibetan mastiff (Luke
(Credit: Summit Entertainment)

An animated film about a Tibetan mastiff (Luke Wilson) who leaves his rural home to become a musician. Eddie Izzard is quite funny as British rock star Angus Scattergood (a white cat with black shades), but the overall story is so skimpy that even young viewers might feel a bit cheated. Read our review here.

"T2 Trainspotting"

Twenty years after Danny Boyle's landmark youth film,
(Credit: Sony-TriStar / Jaap Buitendijk)

Twenty years after Danny Boyle's landmark youth film, "Trainspotting," the once-freewheeling characters return to ruminate on misspent youth and advancing age. It's a little unfocused, but the original actors -- Ewan McGregor, Ewen Bremner, Jonny Lee Miller and Robert Carlyle -- are as charismatic as ever. Read our review here.

"Smurfs: The Lost Village"

The latest entry in a little-loved franchise turns
(Credit: Sony Pictures Animation)

The latest entry in a little-loved franchise turns out to be a pleasant surprise that shines an overdue spotlight on Smurfette (Demi Lovato provides her voice). With a very funny Rainn Wilson as the evil wizard Gargamel. Read our review here.

"Free Fire"

An illegal gun buy goes terribly wrong in
(Credit: AP)

An illegal gun buy goes terribly wrong in this ensemble action flick starring Brie Larson, Armie Hammer, Sharlto Copley and many others. It wants to be a powder-keg action-comedy with an ironic edge, but it feels more like a 20-year latecomer to the "Pulp Fiction" trend. Read our review here.

"The Lego Batman Movie"

The follow-up to
(Credit: Warner Bros. Pictures / DC Comics )

The follow-up to "The Lego Movie" goes more for spoof than for story, which should suit certain children (and parents) just fine. Will Arnett once again plays Batman as a laughably self-serious superhero, while Zach Galifianakis is a fine choice as the voice of the nefarious yet emotionally needy Joker. Read our review here.

"The Great Wall"

At this year's Oscars, host Jimmy Kimmel razzed
(Credit: Universal Pictures / Jasin Boland)

At this year's Oscars, host Jimmy Kimmel razzed Matt Damon for starring in this "Chinese ponytail movie" about a European mercenary who discovers that monsters are trying to invade China. It isn't completely awful, but the substandard effects and thin characters make it tough to recommend. Read our review here.

"Colossal"

As a giant monster attacks South Korea, an
(Credit: AP)

As a giant monster attacks South Korea, an American slacker (Anne Hathaway) realizes it's actually a manifestation of her troubled psyche. The weird premise somehow works on both a comedic and emotional level, making this one of the year's best surprises. With Jason Sudeikis. Read our review here.

"The Lovers"

When a philandering husband and wife finally decide
(Credit: A24/Robb Rosenfeld)

When a philandering husband and wife finally decide to split, something weird happens: They fall in love again. The fine-tuned performances of Debra Winger and Tracy Letts make this an offbeat gem. Read our review here.

"Logan"

Hugh Jackman bows out of the
(Credit: 20th Century Fox/Ben Rothstein)

Hugh Jackman bows out of the "Wolverine" franchise with this unexpectedly gritty action film. It's a Marvel Western, riddled with bullets and a sense of twilight mortality. When it works, it feels like a whole new kind of superhero film. When it doesn't, well, it definitely doesn't. With Patrick Stewart and Dafne Keen. Read our review here.

"Office Christmas Party"

It's basically the workplace version of
(Credit: Paramount Pictures/DreamWorks Pictures/Glen Wilson)

It's basically the workplace version of "The Hangover" (from the same writers) with a better-than-average cast and a couple of good laughs. Starring Jason Bateman, Jennifer Aniston and T.J. Miller. Read our review here.

"Kong: Skull Island"

The newest entry in the patchy King Kong
(Credit: Warner Bros. Pictures / Chuck Zlotnick)

The newest entry in the patchy King Kong series feels remarkably fresh, somewhere between big-budget monster movie and Vietnam War film. Dazzling direction by Jordan Vogt-Roberts and a top-flight cast (Tom Hiddleston, John C. Reilly, Brie Larson) make this a must-see. Read our review here.

"The Boss Baby"

Alec Baldwin is quite funny as the voice
(Credit: AP)

Alec Baldwin is quite funny as the voice of a suit-wearing infant in this animated movie, but be warned: "The Boss Baby" has a pabulum-like plot. Kids won't care, thanks to a preponderance of slapstick antics and diaper jokes. Read our review here.

"My Cousin Rachel"

In 19th century England, a sheltered young man
(Credit: TNS/Nicola Dove/Fox Searchlight)

In 19th century England, a sheltered young man (Sam Claflin) falls for a mysterious woman (Rachel Weisz) who may be trying to kill him. It's a handsome, elegant production with a Gothic chill from director Roger Michell ("Notting Hill"). Read our review here.

"Table 19"

Anna Kendrick attends the wedding of an ex-boyfriend
(Credit: AP)

Anna Kendrick attends the wedding of an ex-boyfriend and finds that she's been seated at a table of outcasts. The story is obviously modeled on "The Breakfast Club" -- the princess, the basket case, etc. -- but it makes little sense in the context of a wedding. Too bad, because Craig Robinson, June Squibb, Stephen Merchant and Lisa Kudrow could have made a great ensemble.

"The Belko Experiment"

In a remote office building, 80 office workers
(Credit: MGM)

In a remote office building, 80 office workers are held captive and told they must kill one another. Nasty fun, thanks to entertaining character actors such as John C. McGinley and Tony Goldwyn. Read our review here.

"The Zookeeper's Wife"

Jessica Chastain stars as Antonina Zabinska, a real-life
(Credit: Focus Features / Anne Marie Fox)

Jessica Chastain stars as Antonina Zabinska, a real-life woman who helped shelter about 300 Jews in Poland's Warsaw Zoo during World War II. Handsomely made, though somewhat grit-free for a Holocaust film. Read our review here.

"The Circle"

A young techie (Emma Watson) joins a Silicon
(Credit: STX Entertainment)

A young techie (Emma Watson) joins a Silicon Valley company bent on improving the world by eradicating privacy. It's a shallow dig into a deep subject, and not a very effective thriller, either. Also starring Tom Hanks. Read our review here.

"A Dog's Purpose"

A golden retriever finds himself reincarnated as different
(Credit: AP)

A golden retriever finds himself reincarnated as different breeds with different human owners. This is a mostly family-friendly weeper, marred by some dark moments of violence and suffering. With Britt Robertson and Dennis Quaid. Read our review here.

"Going in Style"

Three senior citizens decide to hold up a
(Credit: ATSUSHI NISHIJIMA)

Three senior citizens decide to hold up a bank. Morgan Freeman, Michael Caine and Alan Arkin keep this heist film breezy and pleasant, though it pales next to the poignant original (from 1979) with George Burns, Art Carney and Lee Strasberg. Read our review here.

"Saban's Power Rangers"

A big-screen version of the junk-TV show in
(Credit: AP)

A big-screen version of the junk-TV show in which five teenagers are granted superpowers by an alien being. This is an attempt at an update for the Marvel age, but the combination of teen-level innuendo, rugged action and kid-friendly comedy proves fatal. With Dacre Montgomery and Naomi Scott. Read our review here.

"King Arthur: Legend of the Sword"

Guy Ritchie's version of the British myth is
(Credit: Warner Bros. Pictures/Courtesy of Warner Bros. Pictures)

Guy Ritchie's version of the British myth is a confused mix of thunderous fantasy and street-smart cheekiness, but it works passably well as a pure, brainless spectacle. With Charlie Hunnam and Astrid Berges-Frisbey. Read our review here.

"The Fate of the Furious"

Not the strongest entry in the series, but
(Credit: Universal Pictures/Matt Kennedy)

Not the strongest entry in the series, but it offers plenty of slick action with the usual charismatic cast (Vin Diesel, Jason Statham, Dwayne Johnson). New addition Charlize Theron brings an icy-sexy vibe to the villain, a super-hacker named Cipher. Also available in the Extended Director's Cut. Read our review here.

"Snatched"

Goldie Hawn and Amy Schumer play a mother
(Credit: Twentieth Century Fox / Justina Mintz)

Goldie Hawn and Amy Schumer play a mother and daughter kidnapped during a vacation in Ecuador. It's the usual R-rated stuff, with a few decent laughs, but not the comedy gold it could have been. Read our review here.

"The Founder"

The story of Ray Kroc, the man who
(Credit: TNS / The Weinstein Company)

The story of Ray Kroc, the man who founded -- or rather, found -- McDonald's. Michael Keaton is the special sauce in this drama, which is also chock full of fascinating fast-food history. Nick Offerman and John Carroll Lynch play the forgotten McDonald brothers. Read our review here.

"Gold"

A modern-day prospector (Matthew McConaughey) risks everything to
(Credit: Patrick Brown)

A modern-day prospector (Matthew McConaughey) risks everything to drill in Indonesia, only to discover that Wall Street has designs on his treasure. It's a semi-true story and only semi-convincing, but it's mostly entertaining. With Bryce Dallas Howard and Edgar Ramirez. Read our review here.

"Alien: Covenant"

Ridley Scott augments his
(Credit: AP)

Ridley Scott augments his "Alien" franchise with this expensive-looking entry starring Michael Fassbender in a dual role as opposing androids. It's an eyepopper, but the familiar storyline and the face-chomping creatures are getting a little worn out. Read our review here.

"Diary of a Wimpy Kid: The Long Haul"

The fourth film in the underrated franchise, based
(Credit: Twentieth Century Fox / Daniel McFadden)

The fourth film in the underrated franchise, based on Jeff Kinney's children's books, brings in an all-new cast and a disappointing level of bathroom humor. With Jason Drucker and Alicia Silverstone. Read our review here.

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