Few actors had as auspicious a start in movies as Don Murray. Not only did the East Rockway-raised actor get to work opposite the most popular star of the time, Marilyn Monroe, in the 1956 classic “Bus Stop,” but his performance as a rambunctious cowboy earned him an Oscar nomination. Superstardom should have been a given.

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Though Murray did go on to make several major films, including Otto Preminger’s “Advise and Consent” (1962), his career took a back seat to other interests, most notably his commitment to helping refugees in Europe. Now Murray shares his story in the documentary “Unsung Hero,” which is getting a preview screening at Cinema Arts Centre in Huntington on Sunday, July 17, at 11 a.m. Murray will be on hand to discuss the film, along with director Don Malcolm; his son, Chris Murray, and film historians Foster Hirsch and Jud Newborn. Comment cards will be also be handed out afterward for audience members to provide feedback.

As a bonus, at 1 p.m. the rarely seen 1972 drama “Call Me by My Rightful Name,” starring Murray and Otis Young as biracial roommates, will also be shown. Brunch will also be served at 10 a.m.

Tickets are $15 and are available at cinemaartscentre.org