Review: 'Girl Most Likely'

Plot: A once-promising writer goes on a downward spiral. Rated PG-13 (sexual content, language)

Bottom line: Instantly forgettable.

Cast: Kristen Wiig, Annette Bening, Matt Dillon

Length: 1:43

'Girl Most Likely' review: Forgettable Kristen Wiig

Kristen Wiig, left, and Annette Bening star in

Kristen Wiig, left, and Annette Bening star in "Girl Most Likely." (Credit: MCT)

"Girl Most Likely" is a comedy from Kristen Wiig's alternate universe career -- the career she might have had without "Bridesmaids." A daft, thin and instantly forgettable farce about a woman of once-great promise who fakes a suicide attempt to hang on to a beau who is bailing on her, it's the sort of movie that has its Manhattan heroine turn out to be from New Jersey -- as if that's all it takes for hilarity to ensue. It relies on Wiig's charms, Matt Dillon's wackiness and lots of examples of that favorite crutch of underwhelming romantic comedy directors -- cute time-lapse montages set to pop music.

Imogene (Wiig) is a blurb writer for the arts section of a New York magazine. It's not exactly where she saw herself 10 years ago, when her student play was winning acclaim and her future seemed bright.

And then she's fired from that blurb gig, gets dumped by her beau, attempts suicide and is hospitalized.

The hospital promptly "sentences" her to be taken home by her estranged mother -- who lives in New Jersey.

Annette Bening is the blowzy mom Imogene so wanted to escape. She's living with a blow hard (Matt Dillon) who whispers to one and all that he's a C.I.A. hit man. And they're all sharing the rattletrap house with Imogene's special-needs brother (Christopher Fitzgerald). Imogene's old room? Zelda rented it out to hunky young club entertainer Lee (Darren Criss, "Glee").

"Girl Most Likely" tracks Imogene's attempts to hang onto her wealthier, shallower New York mean-girl friends, her tentative attraction to Lee and her efforts to make sense of a life that had so much promise and went so wrong.

But co-directors Shari Springer Berman and Robert Pulcini never find the right balance between pathos and farce.


PLOT A once-promising writer goes on a downward spiral.

RATING PG-13 (sexual content, language)

CAST Kristen Wiig, Annette Bening, Matt Dillon

LENGTH 1:43

BOTTOM LINE Instantly forgettable

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