Maurice Sendak told Spike Jonze from the start to make the story his own - and the author was pleased with the results.

"As you do these things, you relive them - and that's not always a pleasant experience," Sendak said. "Spike was reliving his business and giving Max his Spikean drama, which is what it was all supposed to be. I was not supposed to sit there and tell them, 'Make it this way, make it that way.' "

The two had talked for years about adapting the book to film, and Jonze finally found his way into the story as he mused about not where the wild things are, but who they are.

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"As a kid, one of the things that can feel scary or out of control is wild emotions, out-ofcontrol emotions, either in yourself or the people around you," Jonze said. "Having a tantrum, that's scary as a kid, because you just see red. Trying to make a movie that feels like what it feels to be 9 years old at times, that was the idea." - AP

 

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