Troy Ramey thought he couldn’t lose.

The singer-songwriter from Sea Cliff says he didn’t expect to go very far on “The Voice” when he auditioned for season 12 of the singing competition last year. But he believed that trying out for the show would only add to the momentum of his career.

“It was the best decision I could’ve made,” says Ramey, 32, who was fought over by all four coaches and finished 12th on the show. “It was a once-in-a-lifetime chance.”

And now, as he sits at Caelum Music in Oceanside, where he is working on his new album, Ramey is trying to figure out how to make the most of that chance. He has recovered from the emotional roller-coaster ride of being selected as a finalist for the show on Gwen Stefani’s team and then being unexpectedly kicked off. He says that his version of “ ‘Drift Away’ was No. 1 on the iTunes rock chart, and I was on the plane going home. People recognized me on the plane and said I shouldn’t have been cut. It was kind of sad.”

However, Ramey is now ready to build his career, not strategize about his run on a TV show.

He knows that will involve touring, including headlining Amityville Music Hall on Sunday, June 25, and cultivating the connection he has made with his fans.

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“I want to interact with them every single day,” he says. “I don’t want to be just a blip on the screen.”

Ramey has seen his time on “The Voice” bolster interest in his original music, which, even before he appeared on the show, had already racked up a million streams on Spotify, with songs like the rocking “Song Man” and the powerful ballad “Rosar.”

That fan base has only grown wider and deeper from his being seen weekly on the show, giving him a string of songs that reached the Top 10 on the iTunes pop chart and ones that reached No. 1 on the iTunes rock chart. “The very first time I broke into the Top 10, I thought, ‘This is crazy,’ ” he says. “It really is the power of the show.”

Ramey is now hoping he can match that success when he sings his own songs. “My music is not really for the masses,” he says. “I would like to be someone like Hozier, who has a great career by being himself. I just want to make music I would listen to.”