In the annual axing of Broadway plays following the results of the Tony Awards, three shows have announced closings.

First to shutter will be director Trip Cullman’s revival of John Guare’s “Six Degrees of Separation,” a fact-based drama of a young man who infiltrates New York society by claiming to be the son of actor Sidney Poitier. The limited-run production, which began previews April 5 and opened April 25 at the Ethel Barrymore Theatre for a scheduled 15 weeks, will close Sunday. Though Tony-nominated for Best Revival and for leading man Corey Hawkins, it had broken 50 percent theater capacity only once in the past three weeks.

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Thanking Cullman and stars Hawkins, Allison Janney and John Benjamin Hickey, producer Stuart Thompson said in a statement that he and his partners “are tremendously proud to have brought John Guare’s seminal work back to Broadway after 27 years. . . . It has been a rare pleasure.”

Closing June 25 are this year’s Pulitzer Prize-winning drama, Lynn Nottage’s “Sweat,” and Paula Vogel’s drama with music, “Indecent.”

Thompson, also a producer of “Sweat,” said in a joint statement with producer Louise Gund that the timely tale of factory workers in Reading, Pennsylvania, “will have very long life in regional theaters across the country” and that the producers “are so very proud to have given Lynn her much-deserved Broadway debut.” Opening March 26 at Studio 54, it earned Tony nominations for Best Play and for stars Johanna Day and Michelle Wilson, and had been operating at 76 percent to 77 percent capacity.

“Indecent,” Pulitzer Prize-winner Vogel’s play based on the real-life troupe behind the controversial 1923 Broadway play “God of Vengeance,” opened April 18 at the Cort Theatre and had operated at 51 percent to 59 percent capacity over the past three weeks. Producers Daryl Roth, Elizabeth McCann and Cody Lassen said in a statement that the play “is storytelling in the theater at its very best, and we are grateful that this powerful story will live on.” It was Tony-nominated for Best Play and won for Rebecca Taichman’s direction and Christopher Akerlind’s lighting design.