“No one wants to be home alone tonight,” says an anxious, troubled member of the family in “Women of a Certain Age,” the third and final part of Richard Nelson’s “The Gabriels: Election Year in the Life of One Family.”

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The press was urged to attend the finale of this seriously wonderful trilogy on the real election night last Tuesday, as the Gabriels, too, were gathering to cook, deal with personal financial catastrophes and await the presidential results. The company that has been with the plays all year remains the rare ensemble with no membrane between performance and what feels like intimate reality.

What now? What next? Their words hung in the air as we filed into the Public Theater lobby to get early results from the TV. Nelson’s goal, as expressed in the program, was to “portray a world where the personal, the cultural, the societal, the familial, the artistic, the political are viewed not as separate categories, but as dependent aspects of each of our lives.” He does all that, and more.