'Brooklyn Nine-Nine' review: Off-the-cuffs cop

From Emmy Award-winning writer/producers Dan Goor and Michael From Emmy Award-winning writer/producers Dan Goor and Michael Schur), and starring Emmy Award winners Andy Samberg and Andre Braugher, "Brooklyn Nine-Nine" is a new single-camera ensemble comedy about what happens when a talented, but carefree, detective and his diverse group of colleagues get a new captain with a lot to prove. Photo Credit: FoxTV

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REVIEW

THE SHOW "Brooklyn Nine-Nine"

WHEN | WHERE Tuesday night at 8:30 on Fox/5

WHAT IT'S ABOUT Det. Jake Peralta (Andy Samberg) of Brooklyn 99th Precinct is the office cut-up -- except his cutting-up days may be coming to an end, as his new boss, Capt. Ray Holt (Andre Braugher) makes it a personal mission to clean up both the precinct and Peralta. Jake's colleagues, like Det. Amy Santiago (Melissa Fumero), have long since adapted to Jake's ways. The show is produced by Dan Goor and Mike Schur ("Parks and Recreation").

MY SAY The appeal of "Brooklyn Nine-Nine" can be summed up in just two names -- "Andy" and "Samberg." If you like Andy Samberg, you'll like "Brooklyn Nine-Nine." Don't like Samberg, next . . .

Naturally, this two-name review is of little value to those who have never heard of Samberg, so to elaborate: The former "SNL" star's character on this new series is a wickedly quick wit, full of himself, obnoxious and funny. There's some boyish charm and whimsy that sands down those edges, possibly a touch of vulnerability, and no apparent meanness, either, which helps, too.

Clearly, Fox is betting that there's something here, and there certainly is. But Fox shouldn't expect miracles, nor should you. As workplace comedies go, "Brooklyn" is a relatively soft, subtle sell. Samberg has been surrounded by a good but largely unknown cast -- with the exception of Braugher's Holt, who is the adult countermeasure to Samberg's smart-aleck adolescent Peralta. Much more than a straight man, however, he gives Peralta -- or so the pilot hints -- the barest glimmer of maturity and depth. That's good, too, because Peralta might otherwise be insufferable.

BOTTOM LINE Easily one of fall's better new comedies, but don't expect to be blown away yet. The pilot offers just a taste of what's to come, which is plenty good enough.

GRADE B+

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