Charles Osgood — whose voice, style and (yes) bowtie came to represent Sunday mornings for millions of viewers over nearly a quarter century — will retire from “CBS News Sunday Morning” on Sept. 25. 

In announcing his own departure on the broadcast Sunday, he said: “Some of you may have heard rumors lately that I won’t be hosting these ‘Sunday Morning’ broadcasts very much longer. Well, I’m here to tell you that the rumors are true.”

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Osgood, 83, cited age (“I’m pushing 84”) as reason for his departure. Those “rumors” he cited first appeared in the New York tabloids some months ago.

Nevertheless, CBS certainly never appeared in a hurry to seek a successor (one was not named Sunday) and Osgood didn’t seem in a hurry to leave either. “Sunday Morning” remains a successful program, both editorially and from a ratings perspective. Launched in 1979 by a legendary CBS News producer (Shad Northshield) and anchored by Charles Kuralt until his retirement in 1994, “Sunday” was and remains something of a redoubt on television — possibly the quietest 90 minutes of television but also one of TV’s most thoughtful and intelligent programs. Osgood’s style and interests matched “Sunday Morning” just about perfectly. 

“Charlie is not just beloved by our viewers, he’s beloved by all of us who work each week crafting the stories we put on the program,” said Rand Morrison, executive producer of “Sunday Morning,” in a statement. “Working with him truly has been an honor, a privilege and a joy. We look forward to paying tribute to him and his legendary career in September — and, of course, seeing him on the radio.” 

Osgood’s daily news commentary, “The Osgood File,” will continue. In fact, Osgood has spent much of his 45-year career at CBS on radio.

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He added in his statement: “It’s been a great run, but after nearly 50 years at CBS, including the last 22 years here on ‘Sunday Morning,’ the time has come. The date is set for me to do my farewell ‘Sunday Morning.’ It’s September the 25th, after which you can still see me on the radio.”