'Collection Intervention' shows off cool stuff

Elyse Luray in Syfy's newest reality series, "Collection

Elyse Luray in Syfy's newest reality series, "Collection Intervention." (Credit: Syfy)

UNSCRIPTED SERIES "Collection Intervention"

WHEN | WHERE Tuesday night at 10:30 (thereafter Tuesday at 10 p.m.) on Syfy

REASON TO WATCH You meet obsessive collectors whose house is crammed to the rafters with their goodies. Time for pity? Or envy?

WHAT IT'S ABOUT The recent series premiere (repeating at 8 a.m. Tuesday on Syfy, anytime at syfy.com) visited two couples consumed in chaos, thanks to their uber-collecting. Every-foot-of-the-house "Star Wars" acquirer Consetta couldn't let loose of anything -- "Everything is very personal to me. They're my friends" -- even for big bucks, despite her co-collector husband's wish to winnow it down. And Catwoman freak Mark was so obsessive, he was hiding his collection from fed-up wife Lolly, piling it in the garage where its value was dissolving.

So appraiser-host, Port Washington's Elyse Luray (PBS' "History Detectives"), also plays psychologist. She gently helps collectors prioritize what they really love, acknowledge their attachments and find ways to actually enjoy their collections -- not to mention make some money out of them.

MY SAY We've already checked out Travel's new Wednesday nostalgia series "Toy Hunter," which takes a breezy wow-cool-items approach. Now we get Syfy's "Collection Intervention," which recognizes collectors' intense emotional bonds with their "stuff." What looks like overkill accumulation might actually be satisfying soul-deep needs.

Of course, one person's "need" is another person's annoyance. In steps Christie's veteran Luray to enable sorting the truly rare from the mere vintage, the prized from the panic-inducing. One of last week's collectors acknowledged "the whole journey" she led toward putting his hoarding in larger perspective. Saying goodbye to treasured items is indeed a process, in which that hour's other collector couldn't engage until considering she would be sharing the joy of her items with others.

Who, for all we know, may have problems of their own.

This show could run forever.

BOTTOM LINE Sincere host, unguarded participants, sensitive treatment. And more cool stuff! Tuesday night: Hot Wheels and Barbie!

GRADE A-

advertisement | advertise on newsday

Related Stories

Newsday on social media

@Newsday

advertisement | advertise on newsday