Jerry Seinfeld at the press tour, and he came down (a bit) on Conan and supported NBC's Leno experiment.

  In other words, Jerry sounded a bit like a company man yesterday. 
 
 (Suddenly...price of the plane ticket seems worth it; and no, I'm not out there in Pasadena, in case you're wondering. I prefer to write about TV only when the temperature outside is below zero.)

 He was there to promote "The Marriage Ref" - this very  mysterious reality show he's producing for NBC that'll launch after the Olympics. (It's a "comedy" reality show, in the same vein, I suppose, of "Super Nanny," but still...)

 About sqabbling couples and "refs" who sort of tell viewers who's in the right or who's in the wrong. But I could be missing something here...

 Sight unseen - and there was apparently nothing to see - this could be either good or gawdawfulIcantbelieveSeinfeldisdoingthis.

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 We'll see.

 The panelists/guests of marriage ref thingomajig show are: Tina Fey, Alec Baldwin and Charles Barkley.

  Not being at the press tour - and instead enjoying the glories of the frigid northeast -  I'm going to take a wild guess: Jerry looks tan, fit and relaxed.

  He was of course asked about "The Jay Leno Show" (and my thanks to the splendid and timely "Live Feed," via James Hibberd of the Hollywood Reporter, for the quotes):

  "It was the right idea at the wrong time. I also think this was the right idea at the wrong time. I'm proud that NBC had the guts to try something."

 Hey, how about that Conan guy, Jerry:

 "What did the network do to him?" Seinfeld asked. "I don't think anyone's preventing people from watching Conan. Once they give you the cameras, it's on you. I can't blame NBC for having to move things around. I hope Conan stays, I think he's terrific. But there's no rules in show business, there's no refs."

 [Editorial comment by TVZone blogger: Jeez, Jerry, there's a marriage ref...And you sound like you were trading notes and quotes with Jeff Gaspin.]

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