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A Monarch butterfly perches on yarrow plant at (Credit: Leslie Barbaro)

A Monarch butterfly perches on yarrow plant at the Greenburgh Nature Center in Scarsdale. (June 27, 2012)

Butterfly exhibit at Greenburgh Nature Center in Scarsdale

A variety of native butterflies will be on display at Greenburgh Nature Center in Scarsdale through Sept. 2. The exhibit is free with museum admission and is sponsored in part by Central Animal Hospital, Geraldine Stutz Trust, Inc., ShopRite, WFAS, Whole Foods Market (White Plains and Yonkers) and Westchester County Parks. (June 27, 2012)

A Monarch butterfly perches on yarrow plant at
(Credit: Leslie Barbaro)

A Monarch butterfly perches on yarrow plant at the Greenburgh Nature Center in Scarsdale. (June 27, 2012)

Joseph D'Onofrio, 4, of Tuckahoe, catches a butterfly
(Credit: Leslie Barbaro)

Joseph D'Onofrio, 4, of Tuckahoe, catches a butterfly on the flower of a lantana plant at the Greenburgh Nature Center in Scarsdale. (June 27, 2012)

A Monarch butterfly perches on a royal red
(Credit: Leslie Barbaro)

A Monarch butterfly perches on a royal red butterfly bush at the Greenburgh Nature Center. (June 27, 2012)

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Annie McLoughlin, 4, of Scarsdale, catches a butterfly
(Credit: Leslie Barbaro)

Annie McLoughlin, 4, of Scarsdale, catches a butterfly on the flower of a lantana plant at the Greenburgh Nature Center in Scarsdale. (June 27, 2012)

A Monarch butterfly perches on a lantana flower
(Credit: Leslie Barbaro)

A Monarch butterfly perches on a lantana flower at the Greenburgh Nature Center in Scarsdale. (June 27, 2012)

Indoor exhibits and animal museum hours for the
(Credit: Leslie Barbaro)

Indoor exhibits and animal museum hours for the Greenburgh Nature Center are 9:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Monday-Thursday and 10 a.m.-4:30 p.m. on weekends. (June 27, 2012)

A Monarch butterfly perches on a royal red
(Credit: Leslie Barbaro)

A Monarch butterfly perches on a royal red butterfly bush at the Greenburgh Nature Center. (June 27, 2012)

Josephine Kuhl, left, of White Plains, and her
(Credit: Leslie Barbaro)

Josephine Kuhl, left, of White Plains, and her niece, Nora Kuhl Martinez, visit the Greenburgh Nature Center. (June 27, 2012)

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The life span of a monarch butterfly is
(Credit: Leslie Barbaro)

The life span of a monarch butterfly is four to eight weeks from egg to death. In the fall, however, its life span increases to about nine months, to allow time for the butterflies to migrate to Mexico, lay their eggs and die. (June 27, 2012)

A Monarch butterfly perches on a lantana flower
(Credit: Leslie Barbaro)

A Monarch butterfly perches on a lantana flower at the Greenburgh Nature Center in Scarsdale. (June 27, 2012)

Young monarch caterpillars sit on a milkweed plant
(Credit: Leslie Barbaro)

Young monarch caterpillars sit on a milkweed plant at Greenburgh Nature Center. (June 27, 2012)

Butterflies on display at the Greenburgh Nature Center
(Credit: Leslie Barbaro)

Butterflies on display at the Greenburgh Nature Center will include Eastern black swallowtails, red admirals and question marks. (June 27, 2012)

Butterflies on display at the Greenburgh Nature Center
(Credit: Leslie Barbaro)

Butterflies on display at the Greenburgh Nature Center will include Eastern black swallowtails, red admirals and question marks. (June 27, 2012)

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Jason D'Onofrio, 7, of Tuckahoe, catches a butterfly
(Credit: Leslie Barbaro)

Jason D'Onofrio, 7, of Tuckahoe, catches a butterfly on the flower of a royal red butterfly bush at the Greenburgh Nature Center in Scarsdale. (June 27, 2012)

Gianna Vincentz, 2, of Tuckahoe, reaches for a
(Credit: Leslie Barbaro)

Gianna Vincentz, 2, of Tuckahoe, reaches for a branch on a lantana plant at the butterfly exhibit at Greenburgh Nature Center in Scarsdale.

Young monarch caterpillars munch on the leaves of
(Credit: Leslie Barbaro)

Young monarch caterpillars munch on the leaves of a milkweed plant at Greenburgh Nature Center. The milkweed plant is toxic to most animals and humans, but not monarchs. The young caterpillars eat the leaves and become butterflies that would be toxic if eaten, thus warding off predators. (June 27, 2012)

Monarch eggs and a young caterpillar sit on
(Credit: Leslie Barbaro)

Monarch eggs and a young caterpillar sit on the leaf of a milkweed plant at Greenburgh Nature Center. The milkweed plant is toxic to most animals and humans, but not monarchs. The young caterpillars eat the leaves and become butterflies that would be toxic if eaten, thus warding off predators. (June 27, 2012)

Butterflies on display at the Greenburgh Nature Center
(Credit: Leslie Barbaro)

Butterflies on display at the Greenburgh Nature Center will include Eastern black swallowtails, red admirals and question marks. (June 27, 2012)

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A monarch butterfly perches on a lantana flower
(Credit: Leslie Barbaro)

A monarch butterfly perches on a lantana flower at the Greenburgh Nature Center in Scarsdale. (June 27, 2012)

Some of the sights at the butterfly exhibit
(Credit: Leslie Barbaro)

Some of the sights at the butterfly exhibit at the Greenburgh Nature Center. (June 27, 2012)

Travis Brady, director of education and living collections
(Credit: Leslie Barbaro)

Travis Brady, director of education and living collections at Greenburgh Nature Center, displays a cecropia caterpillar that will transform into a 6- to 8-inch-long moth -- the largest native moth in North America. (June 27, 2012)

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