'Rihanna 777' documentary and more TV shows with '7' in their titles

Global superstar Rihanna performs in the exclusive world

Global superstar Rihanna performs in the exclusive world premiere concert documentary, "Rihanna 777," airing May 6 (8:00-9:00 PM ET/PT) on Fox. (Credit: Fox)

"Rihanna 777" (Monday at 8 p.m. on Fox/5) is a new documentary that chronicles the singer's concert tour that hit seven countries in seven days with seven shows to promote her seventh album. This certainly puts us in a numerological frame of mind, so what better reason to offer up these five shows, all with "7" in their titles?

77 Sunset Strip (1958-64) -- Extremely cool drama about a pair of L.A. private eyes (Roger Smith, Efrem Zimbalist Jr.) often assisted by the show's breakout character, the jive-talking parking-lot attendant Kookie (Edd Byrnes).

Seven Brides for Seven Brothers (1982-83) -- Three years before he made his mark as "MacGyver," Richard Dean Anderson starred in this updated version of the 1954 musical. The youngest of Anderson's brothers was played by 11-year-old River Phoenix, while future "thirtysomething" star Peter Horton was his 21-year-old sibling.


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704 Hauser (1994) -- Yes, that's the Queens address where Archie Bunker and family lived on "All in the Family" and "Archie Bunker's Place." A decade after the latter series ended, some dingbat at CBS came up with the idea of creating a sitcom in which a black family (headed by liberal dad John Amos, who clashed with conservative son T.E. Russell) now lived there. It was gone after five weeks.

Seven Days (1998-2001) -- Jonathan LaPaglia starred in this UPN sci-fi drama as a former CIA agent recruited by a secret government agency to take part in a time-travel project.

7th Heaven (1996-2007) -- Wholesome family drama with Stephen Collins starring as a minister and head of the Camden clan, Catherine Hicks as his wife and Barry Watson and Jessica Biel as two of their seven -- there's that number again -- kids. The show became TV's longest-running family drama.

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