TV Zone

News, scoops, reviews and more from TV land.

'Mad Men' has finally, officially, wrapped

Jon Hamm arrives at The Hollywood Roosevelt Hotel

(Credit: AP / Invision)

For those obsessed "Mad Men" fans who wondered whether Don Draper, Peggy Olson, Joan Holloway, Roger Sterling and Company would ever fade from the scene, to become part of our cherished TV memories, the moment has arrived. "Mad Men" has slipped into history.

The show held its wrap party during the weekend in Los Angeles, and -- old show biz maxim -- that which has been wrapped cannot be unwrapped, except for the TV movie or perhaps special limited-run series. (Another old show business maxim: Money always talks.)

But "Mad Men" is over and it is inconceivable that it could ever again continue in any fashion, even though "Breaking Bad" has reinterred part of its soul for "Better Call Saul."  Now consider this: All those stars and producers who congregated Saturday at The Roosevelt Hotel in Los Angeles know something you and I don't know -- how it all ends.


MORE: Greatest TV characters | Reality TV | TV Zone blog | TV Listings


What a perfect place for a burial. The old Roosevelt is one of those grand, beautiful, dowdy, heavily rouged LA landmarks -- the Norma Desmond of hotels. (Some might also imagine it evokes the  "Barton Fink" Hotel Earle, but that was shot in the lobby of a classic silent era theater on Western Boulevard, so no relation.)

The Roosevelt is also haunted or reputed to be, and of course Don saw a ghost in the closing seconds of the midseason finale. (Actually, not exactly a "ghost," but we've already discussed this at length.)

 Also: This was the Roosevelt hotel where the first Academy Awards were held. Maybe "MM" held the wrap here to confer good karma onto Jon Hamm, who will most certainly be honored with another Emmy nomination for best actor next week and most certainly deserves to finally win. 

Or maybe this is just practical: A large part of the seventh season after all has been West Coast-based, and maybe the West Coast is where it will all end up.

The Manhattan-based Roosevelt, or just The Roosevelt, like its West Coast counterpart, is of the same vintage. Both were built in the middle of the Jazz Age, honoring a president who at that moment must have seemed the epitome of American ambition and energy. It also happens to figure prominently in "Mad Men" history, as this was the place Don repaired after Betty kicked him out of the house in one of the early seasons.

The Roosevelt of the 1960s -- and like the LA one, has since been refurbished -- was a perfect place for a disgraced ad man looking to hang his hat for a night or two -- a seen-better-times dinosaur that did in fact look like the Hotel Earle, and a quick overnight stop if one missed the last train out of Grand Central, or one's wife had just kicked one out of the house. 

The wrap party in  LA was sponsored by Johnnie Walker. Why booze? Why need you ask with regards to "Mad Men?" Plus, Christina Hendricks was JW's prominent spokeswoman star not too long ago.

(Brooks Brothers was also a sponsor, and as fans know, BB -- just across Madison Avenue from The Roosevelt -- supplied Don's classic suits over the years, and even began a "Mad Men" line. )

I'm going on at length here only for reasons of sentimentality. It's over. Maybe you too feel the slightest sense of loss.

 The last half of the seventh season arrives sometime next year. I'll hold my own private wrap party then, maybe at The Roosevelt. 

AMC's 'TURN' gets a second season

Heather Lind as Anna Strong and Jamie Bell

(Credit: AMC / Antony Platt)

AMC's "Turn" - which didn't get a whole lot of critical attention over its just-concluded 10-episode run but apparently more than enough of the viewer sort - just earned a second season. 

 The statement, via AMC chief Charlie Collier: 

“Craig Silverstein, Barry Josephson [producers and creators] and a talented cast and crew delivered a truly distinctive and engaging premiere season. We look forward to continuing this revolutionary journey into season two. “AMC and its creative partners have a track record of nurturing programs we collectively believe in, patiently growing viewership and engagement over time. With ‘TURN,’ once again, we dive in with our partners to build upon this very promising first season.”

Based on the story of Revolutionary War spy Abe Woodhull of Setauket, AMC says the series attracted a respectable 2 million viewer average over its duration. 

'Mad Men' final season premiere review: Don Draper still in a dark place

Jon Hamm as Don Draper on "Mad Men's"

(Credit: AMC / Michael Yarish)

What it's about: As per custom, "Mad Men" creator Matthew Weiner asked that no plot details of the seventh and final season opener are offered here, so, instead, some broad strokes.

The end of last season fell around Thanksgiving, 1968, and Don (Jon Hamm) was essentially fired from his own agency after suffering a breakdown in a client meeting with Hershey.

However, he had already told...

Read more »

advertisement | advertise on newsday

What’s on TV tonight

advertisement | advertise on newsday