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Robin Roberts of 'GMA' may return in 'weeks'

Co-host Robin Roberts during a broadcast of "Good

Co-host Robin Roberts during a broadcast of "Good Morning America." (Aug. 20, 2012) (Credit: AP)

Robin Roberts -- recuperating from a bone-marrow transplant -- told viewers of "Good Morning America" that she'll be back in "weeks" pending results of a "dry run" -- no specific date set, and echoing what she tweeted late last week. A key issue, naturally, is the flu -- she can't get a flu shot. Here are the details from the ABCnews.com story posted a little while ago...

"Part of the process of re-entry is I got up at 4 a.m. this morning," Roberts said. "That's one thing I have not missed is that alarm clock."

Roberts told her fellow anchors she will be doing a "dry run" next week, coming to the "GMA" studio in Times Square and going through hair and makeup but staying off-air as she adjusts to being back in her surroundings.


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"My skin is very sensitive, and so we have to see how it reacts to the studio lights. My vision is still a little blurry from the treatment," she said. " All of this is getting better day by day so that is the next step.

"After I go through this dry run my doctors will sit down with me again, and we'll evaluate where I am," Roberts said. "I should be back sometime in February. Now I have a date in mind that's very personal and very important to me but I will ultimately listen to, of course, what my doctors say and, course, we have to remember we're in the height of flu season. There's a lot of factors still."

Dr. Richard Besser, ABC News' chief health and medical editor who has been working with Roberts throughout her treatment, also highlighted the importance of protecting Roberts from the flu.

"Her immune system, what protects her from infections, is still rebuilding," he said Monday on "GMA." "She can't get a flu shot yet. Her body won't respond to that. It's not affecting it which is why it's important for other people to get that flu shot to protect her, and I can't tell you how many people here at Times Square studio have told me this is the first year they got a flu shot, and they got it for Robin."  

Tags: robin Roberts , good morning America , abc

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