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More than 100 men, known as paranzas (lifters) (Credit: Newsday/Audrey C. Tiernan)

More than 100 men, known as paranzas (lifters) lift the 70-foot structure called the Giglio (with a band on it) during the Feast of San Paolino held at St. Catherine of Sienna Church in Franklin Square. (June 30, 2012)

Giglio Feast of San Paolino

The Giglio Feast of San Paolino is being celebrated for its second year in Franklin Square at St. Catherine of Sienna from June 16 through July 1, 2012. The celebration is marked by five parts: the building the Giglio tower (June 16) ; the dressing of the Giglio (June 23); the festival of St. Catherine of Sienna (June 27-July 1); the children's lift (June 29); mass (June 30) after which is the first big lift in which about 120 men lift, shoulder and carry the 80-foot tall tower, which weighs more than 5 tons through the town's streets. This tradition is much the same as is celebrated in Italy, East Harlem, Brooklyn and Astoria. In Italy, people throw flowers at the feet of the saint. In Franklin Square, people will dance and feast as the Giglio (Italian for lily) is carried, and an Italian street band will march alongside, playing Italian folk music.

More than 100 men, known as paranzas (lifters)
(Credit: Newsday/Audrey C. Tiernan)

More than 100 men, known as paranzas (lifters) lift the 70-foot structure called the Giglio (with a band on it) during the Feast of San Paolino held at St. Catherine of Sienna Church in Franklin Square. (June 30, 2012)

More than 100 men, known as paranzas (lifters)
(Credit: Newsday/Audrey C. Tiernan)

More than 100 men, known as paranzas (lifters) lift the 70-foot structure called the Giglio (with a band on it) during the Feast of San Paolino held at St. Catherine of Sienna Church in Franklin Square. (June 30, 2012)

Second from right, Anthony Prisco, of Garden City,
(Credit: Newsday/Audrey C. Tiernan)

Second from right, Anthony Prisco, of Garden City, a Capo Paranza in the Sons of San Paolino is joined by more than 100 men, known as paranzas (lifters) to lift the 70-foot structure called the Giglio (with a band on it) during the Feast of San Paolino held at St. Catherine of Sienna Church in Franklin Square. (June 30, 2012)

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More than 100 men, known as paranzas (lifters)
(Credit: Newsday/Audrey C. Tiernan)

More than 100 men, known as paranzas (lifters) lift the 70-foot structure called the Giglio (with a band on it) during the Feast of San Paolino held at St. Catherine of Sienna Church in Franklin Square. (June 30, 2012)

More than 100 men, known as paranzas (lifters)
(Credit: Newsday/Audrey C. Tiernan)

More than 100 men, known as paranzas (lifters) lift the 70-foot structure called the Giglio (with a band on it) during the Feast of San Paolino held at St. Catherine of Sienna Church in Franklin Square. (June 30, 2012)

Far right, Anthony Prisco, of Garden City, a
(Credit: Newsday/Audrey C. Tiernan)

Far right, Anthony Prisco, of Garden City, a Capo Paranza in the Sons of San Paolino is joined by more than 100 men, known as paranzas (lifters) to lift the 70-foot structure called the Giglio (with a band on it) during the Feast of San Paolino held at St. Catherine of Sienna Church in Franklin Square. (June 30, 2012)

Shopkeepers along a stretch of Hempstead Turnpike in
(Credit: Newsday/Audrey. C. Tiernan)

Shopkeepers along a stretch of Hempstead Turnpike in Franklin Square pin money on a statue of San Paolino that is being carried by members of the Sons of San Paolino in a procession that followed the construction of a 78-foot tall structure called a Giglio. (June 23, 2012)

Members of the Sons of San Paolino carry
(Credit: Newsday/Audrey C. Tiernan)

Members of the Sons of San Paolino carry a statue of San Paolino down Hempstead Turnpike in Franklin Square. This procession follows the construction of a 78-foot tall structure called a Giglio. (June 23, 2012)

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Members of the Sons of San Paolino carry
(Credit: Newsday/Audrey C. Tiernan)

Members of the Sons of San Paolino carry a statue of San Paolino down Hempstead Turnpike in Franklin Square. This procession follows the construction of a 78-foot tall structure called a Giglio. (June 23, 2012)

Members of the Sons of San Paolino build
(Credit: Newsday/Audrey C. Tiernan)

Members of the Sons of San Paolino build a structure called a Giglio, the centerpiece of The Giglio Feast of San Paolino, which has continued annually for about 1,600 years. The feast commemorates the return of San Paolino to Nola, Italy around AD 411. The townspeople greeted his return by throwing lilies at his feet. Gigli means lily in Italian, hence the Gigli Feast of San Paolino. The tradition spread to Greenpoint, Brooklyn in 1903. There are now three Gigli built in the United States, one in Franklin Square at St. Catherine of Sienna Church. The Giglio Feast of San Paolino begins Wednesday, June 27.

Nick Tamburrino, a member of the Sons of
(Credit: Newsday/Audrey C. Tiernan)

Nick Tamburrino, a member of the Sons of San Paolino paints a piece of the Giglio, Phil Bruno helps by holding the piece. The giglio is a 78-foot tall structure that is the centerpiece of The Giglio Feast of San Paolino at St. Catherine of Sienna Church in Franklin Square. (June 23, 2012)

Nick Tamburrino, a member of the Sons of
(Credit: Newsday/Audrey C. Tiernan)

Nick Tamburrino, a member of the Sons of San Paolino paints a piece of the Giglio, a 78-foot tall structure that is the centerpiece of The Giglio Feast of San Paolino at St. Catherine of Sienna Church in Franklin Square. (June 23, 2012)

Members of the Sons of San Paolino build
(Credit: Newsday/Audrey C. Tiernan)

Members of the Sons of San Paolino build a structure called a Giglio, the centerpiece of The Giglio Feast of San Paolino, which has continued annually for about 1,600 years. The feast commemorates the return of San Paolino to Nola, Italy around AD 411. The townspeople greeted his return by throwing lilies at his feet. Gigli means lily in Italian, hence the Gigli Feast of San Paolino. The tradition spread to Greenpoint, Brooklyn in 1903. There are now three Gigli built in the United States, one in Franklin Square at St. Catherine of Sienna Church. The Giglio Feast of San Paolino begins Wednesday, June 27.

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ADVERTISE HERE
Members of the Sons of San Paolino build
(Credit: Newsday/Audrey C. Tiernan)

Members of the Sons of San Paolino build a structure called a Giglio, the centerpiece of The Giglio Feast of San Paolino, which has continued annually for about 1,600 years. The feast commemorates the return of San Paolino to Nola, Italy around AD 411. The townspeople greeted his return by throwing lilies at his feet. Gigli means lily in Italian, hence the Gigli Feast of San Paolino. The tradition spread to Greenpoint, Brooklyn in 1903. There are now three Gigli built in the United States, one in Franklin Square at St. Catherine of Sienna Church. The Giglio Feast of San Paolino begins Wednesday, June 27.

Members of the Sons of San Paolino build
(Credit: Newsday/Audrey C. Tiernan)

Members of the Sons of San Paolino build a structure called a Giglio, the centerpiece of The Giglio Feast of San Paolino, which has continued annually for about 1,600 years. The feast commemorates the return of San Paolino to Nola, Italy around AD 411. The townspeople greeted his return by throwing lilies at his feet. Gigli means lily in Italian, hence the Gigli Feast of San Paolino. The tradition spread to Greenpoint, Brooklyn in 1903. There are now three Gigli built in the United States, one in Franklin Square at St. Catherine of Sienna Church. The Giglio Feast of San Paolino begins Wednesday, June 27.

Members of the Sons of San Paolino build
(Credit: Newsday/Audrey C. Tiernan)

Members of the Sons of San Paolino build a structure called a Giglio, the centerpiece of The Giglio Feast of San Paolino, which has continued annually for about 1,600 years. The feast commemorates the return of San Paolino to Nola, Italy around AD 411. The townspeople greeted his return by throwing lilies at his feet. Gigli means lily in Italian, hence the Gigli Feast of San Paolino. The tradition spread to Greenpoint, Brooklyn in 1903. There are now three Gigli built in the United States, one in Franklin Square at St. Catherine of Sienna Church. The Giglio Feast of San Paolino begins Wednesday, June 27.

Members of the Sons of San Paolino build
(Credit: Newsday/Audrey C. Tiernan)

Members of the Sons of San Paolino build a structure called a Giglio, the centerpiece of The Giglio Feast of San Paolino, which has continued annually for about 1,600 years. The feast commemorates the return of San Paolino to Nola, Italy around AD 411. The townspeople greeted his return by throwing lilies at his feet. Gigli means lily in Italian, hence the Gigli Feast of San Paolino. The tradition spread to Greenpoint, Brooklyn in 1903. There are now three Gigli built in the United States, one in Franklin Square at St. Catherine of Sienna Church. The Giglio Feast of San Paolino begins Wednesday, June 27.

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