Julio Acevedo arrested in Brooklyn hit-and-run deaths of Nachman and Raizy Glauber

Police have identified Julio Acevedo as a suspect

Police have identified Julio Acevedo as a suspect in the Brooklyn hit-and-run that left a Hasidic couple and their baby dead. (March 4, 2013) (Credit: NYPD)

Julio Acevedo, the driver suspected of fleeing a Brooklyn crash that killed an expectant mother, her Monsey-reared husband and later their newborn son, surrendered Wednesday to NYPD detectives in Pennsylvania.

Wearing a bright blue hoodie, Acevedo calmly walked to officers waiting in an SUV in a parking lot of the Turkey Hill Minit Mart in Bethlehem, Pa. He was arrested on charges of leaving the scene of an accident, said NYPD spokesman Paul Browne.

The 5:10 p.m. surrender was brokered by a friend who had been in touch with police earlier in the day. The friend met officers at Grand Central Terminal in Manhattan, then led them to Acevedo in Bethlehem, about 80 miles away, police said.


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The 44-year-old ex-con was being held by Pennsylvania State Police awaiting extradition to New York City, said Browne, who added that it wasn't clear when he would be returned.

It also wasn't immediately clear whether Acevedo had an attorney. The friend had told police that Acevedo would surrender after consulting a lawyer, but no attorney was with him when he turned himself in, Browne said.

Acevedo faces felony charges in the fatal accident in which he allegedly slammed the BMW he was driving into a livery cab, killing Nachman and Raizy Glauber, both 21-year-old Orthodox Jews living in Williamsburg, Brooklyn. Raizy Glauber was seven months pregnant, and her son was delivered Sunday by Cesarean section. He died Monday.

For friends and family of the couple, the arrest was "a bitter pill to swallow," said Isaac Abraham, a spokesman for the Hasidic Jewish community.

"It's a little good news that at least the man responsible has been arrested, but it doesn't bring any of the victims back," he said.

He added that community members hoped Acevedo would face murder charges.

"We in the community hope that today is Acevedo's last day that he sees daylight for the rest of his life," Abraham said.

Acevedo served about a decade in prison in the 1990s for manslaughter after he was convicted of shooting Kelvin Martin, a Brooklyn criminal whose moniker "50 Cent" was the inspiration for rapper Curtis Jackson's current stage name.

Last month, officers stopped Acevedo, who was driving erratically. He was found to have a blood-alcohol level of .13 percent, well over the .08 percent limit for legal intoxication in the state, police said, and was charged with driving while under the influence.

It remains unknown whether Acevedo was drinking when he crashed into the livery cab in which the Glaubers were passengers around 1:30 a.m. Sunday.

The details of how the deadly incident unfolded and how Acevedo came to possess the BMW in the crash are under investigation. The registered owner, Takia Walker, was arrested on insurance fraud charges Sunday in a scam involving the car, police said. She was not involved in the crash.

A person familiar with the investigation said Walker bought the car legally, or allowed her identification to be used in the purchase, then gave the vehicle to a middleman who either loaned or rented it out to the driver. The person was not authorized to speak publicly and spoke to The Associated Press on the condition of anonymity.

In the early hours of Sunday, Raizy Glauber wasn't feeling well, so she and her husband called a livery cab to take them to the hospital, said Sara Glauber, Nachman Glauber's cousin. The BMW was traveling at about 60 mph when it smashed into the cab in Williamsburg shortly after 1 a.m., leaving it in a crumpled heap. Raizy Glauber was thrown from the wreckage.

Raizy Glauber grew up in a prominent rabbinical family. Her husband was studying at a rabbinical college. His family founded a line of clothing for Orthodox Jews. The couple and their baby were buried in Kiryas Joel at a cemetery affiliated with their Satmar Hasidic denomination.

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