As the snow thaws, the countdown to spring has begun. And with spring come flip-flops, flowers and outdoor play. To get ready for the warmer weather, Gazillion Bubbles declared this week National Bubble Week.

National Bubble Week originated in 2000 as a way to usher in the spring season -- as springtime is synonymous with outdoor play and fun. If you're looking to celebrate and welcome spring, here are some fun facts from Gazillion Bubbles:

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-- A bubble gets its color from iridescence. As waves of light pass through the bubble, it gets distorted by reflecting off different layers of soap film.

-- You can freeze bubbles. A bubble's shell is composed of a layer of water molecules surrounded by two thin layers of soap. Technically, a bubble will freeze below 32 degress Fahrenheit like all water. The only problem is that bubbles tend to burst after a few seconds, so in order to see a bubble freeze, the temperature needs to fall to a temperature that will freeze water molecules more quickly.

-- Anything that fractures the tenuous layer of water molecules can cause a bubble to burst. For example, a gust of wind or an object (like your finger) will easily cause a bubble to burst. Also, a bubble will burst if enough of the water molecules evaporate.

-- Many bubbles make a foam. When bubbles are joined, they become a foam. From cappuccinos to the foam on the top of your beer, bubbles are all around us.

You can share your bubble celebrations using the hashtag #BubbleWeek and @GazillionBubble.